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Middle passages : African American journeys to Africa, 1787-2005 / James Campbell.

By: Campbell, James T.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Penguin history of American life: Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 2007Description: 513 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., map ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0143111981 (pbk.); 9780143111986 (pbk.).Subject(s): Africa -- Description and travel | African Americans -- Travel -- Africa -- History | African Americans -- Relations with AfricansDDC classification: 916.04/33 LOC classification: DT12.25 | .C36 2007
Contents:
What is Africa to me? -- Ayuba's journey -- Windward coast -- Representing the race -- Emigration or extermination -- Mundele Ndom -- So long, so far away -- The spell of Africa -- Native son, American daughter -- Black star -- Counting the bodies -- The language we cry in.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DT12.25 .C36 2007 (Browse shelf) Checked out 05/15/2020 0000001951896

Originally published: Penguin Press, 2006.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [441]-489) and index.

What is Africa to me? -- Ayuba's journey -- Windward coast -- Representing the race -- Emigration or extermination -- Mundele Ndom -- So long, so far away -- The spell of Africa -- Native son, American daughter -- Black star -- Counting the bodies -- The language we cry in.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Reversing middle passage from Africans' forced transatlantic voyages as slaves to African Americans' voluntary journeys back to Africa, the prize-winning Campbell (American civilization, Africana studies & history, Brown Univ.; Songs of Zion: The African Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States and South Africa) explores spiritual, political, psychological, and emotional dimensions of 220 years of blacks' reconnections with their ancestral homeland. Campbell shows how internal personal and group identities imprinted these itineraries even as the journeys demanded jettisoning preconceptions for black Americans in order to reimagine themselves and their kindred African blacks. His 12 chapters focus on the push and pull of the "Dark Continent" on leading African Americans, past and present, whose reflections illuminate answers to two intertwined questions central to African American history: What is Africa to me? What is America to me? Sweeping in scope, rich in detail, and pointed with insights, Campbell's tour de force offers much to ponder about the African American past and present. Essential for collections on African American history, literature, and culture, the Atlantic world, the black diaspora, Pan Africanism, or what might be called black globalization. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 12/05.]-Thomas J. Davis, Arizona State Univ., Tempe (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Starred Review. Reversing middle passage from Africans' forced transatlantic voyages as slaves to African Americans' voluntary journeys back to Africa, the prize-winning Campbell (American civilization, Africana studies & history, Brown Univ.; Songs of Zion: The African Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States and South Africa) explores spiritual, political, psychological, and emotional dimensions of 220 years of blacks' reconnections with their ancestral homeland. Campbell shows how internal personal and group identities imprinted these itineraries even as the journeys demanded jettisoning preconceptions for black Americans in order to reimagine themselves and their kindred African blacks. His 12 chapters focus on the push and pull of the Dark Continent on leading African Americans, past and present, whose reflections illuminate answers to two intertwined questions central to African American history: What is Africa to me? What is America to me? Sweeping in scope, rich in detail, and pointed with insights, Campbell's tour de force offers much to ponder about the African American past and present. Essential for collections on African American history, literature, and culture, the Atlantic world, the black diaspora, Pan Africanism, or what might be called black globalization. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 12/05.]-- Thomas J. Davis, Arizona State Univ., Tempe

CHOICE Review

This book is not about Africa, but rather about the role that Africa played in the mind's eye of African Americans who returned to their ancestral continent to answer the question "who am I?" In this lucid, engrossing combination of biography and history, Campbell (Brown Univ.) introduces readers to some dozen returnees, some well known like W. E. B. DuBois, Richard Wright, and Langston Hughes, most of them largely unknown, like William Sheppard, Bishop Henry Turner, or Era Bell Thompson. Each of them discovered their own Africa filtered through their American eyes and individual personal experiences. This is the first title in the Penguin "American Life" series to be devoted to interdisciplinary studies of the "new history" of the Atlantic diaspora community. Written in a nonthreatening style that should be attractive to general readers and stimulating to specialists, it offers an engaging approach to multiculturalism that ought to be in every library. Notes, an extended bibliography, and illustrations. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. R. T. Brown formerly, Westfield State College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James T. Campbell , PhD, is professor of United States history and the Edgar E. Robinson Professor in United States history at Stanford University. Dr. Campbell earned his BA from Yale University and both his MA and PhD from Stanford University. He is the author of Race, Nation, and Empire in American History and Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005 .<br> <br> David Levering Lewis is the author of God's Crucible: Islam and the Making of Europe, 570-1215; W. E. B. Du Bois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919; W. E. B. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and the American Century, 1919-1963; and more. Lewis's work can be characterized as comparative history with interests in biography, civil rights, Europe and empire, and cultural politics. He is professor of history at New York University.

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