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What blood won't tell : a history of race on trial in America / Ariela J. Gross.

By: Gross, Ariela Julie.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2008Description: x, 368 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780674031302 (cloth : alk. paper); 067403130X (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Race discrimination -- Law and legislation -- United States | Minorities -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States | United States -- Race relationsDDC classification: 305.800973 LOC classification: KF4755 | .G76 2008
Contents:
The common sense of race -- Performing whiteness -- Race as association -- Citizenship of the "little races" -- Black Indian identity in the allotment era -- From nation to race in Hawai'i -- Racial science, immigration, and the "white races" -- Mexican Americans and the "Caucasian cloak."
Awards: Lillian Smith Book Award, 2009Summary: Gross (Univ. of Southern California, School of Law) writes an amazing book that addresses the relationship between race and citizenship in the US. This book reminds us that the imaginary connection between racial identity and fitness for citizenship remains potent today and continues to impede racial justice and equality. Challenging the presumption of many scholars of the dominance of the one-drop rule in conferring black status, Gross argues that despite the rule, in court and by custom, racial boundaries were much more fluid and flexible yet, primarily in the service of white supremacy. Through a close reading of racial identity trials in America, this book offers an eloquent contribution to ongoing debates over affirmative action, identity politics and the construction of a "colorblind" society.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
KF4755 .G76 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001958784
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
KF4755.A75 E85 1983 Ethnicity, law, and the social good / KF4755 .B76 2007 Race, law, and American society : KF4755 .D45 1998 Race, place, and the law, 1836-1948 / KF4755 .G76 2008 What blood won't tell : KF4755 .P37 2009 What comes naturally : KF4757.A5 F7 1975 Southern justice / KF4757 .C48 2009 Changes in law and society during the Civil War and Reconstruction :

Includes bibliographical references (p. 309-347) and index.

The common sense of race -- Performing whiteness -- Race as association -- Citizenship of the "little races" -- Black Indian identity in the allotment era -- From nation to race in Hawai'i -- Racial science, immigration, and the "white races" -- Mexican Americans and the "Caucasian cloak."

Lillian Smith Book Award, 2009

Gross (Univ. of Southern California, School of Law) writes an amazing book that addresses the relationship between race and citizenship in the US. This book reminds us that the imaginary connection between racial identity and fitness for citizenship remains potent today and continues to impede racial justice and equality. Challenging the presumption of many scholars of the dominance of the one-drop rule in conferring black status, Gross argues that despite the rule, in court and by custom, racial boundaries were much more fluid and flexible yet, primarily in the service of white supremacy. Through a close reading of racial identity trials in America, this book offers an eloquent contribution to ongoing debates over affirmative action, identity politics and the construction of a "colorblind" society.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Capitalizing on the vast works within history and law, including critical race theory, Gross (Univ. of Southern California, School of Law) writes an amazing book that addresses the relationship between race and citizenship in the US. Gross develops her thesis--racism has survived, demonstrating that race is not simply biological but also a societal creation--by giving the reader what she terms "a common sense of race." The true genesis of her work is in outlining how "race" became to be understood as different from "nation." Gross's presentation is both detailed and complex. The first half is devoted to establishing the role race and racism have played within the history and law of the US, as well as further developing the rich literature within whiteness scholarship. The strength of her argument lies in her ability to inject specific examples, oftentimes cases from the 19th century, into her whiteness discussions. The second half is equally impressive. Here Gross utilizes critical race theory to discuss black Indian identity, race in Hawaii, and other contemporary issues. This book is innovative, accessible, and valuable for undergraduates, graduates, and laypeople interested in a deep conversation on race and history. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. A. R. S. Lorenz Ramapo College

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