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When things fell apart : state failure in late-century Africa / Robert H. Bates.

By: Bates, Robert H.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Cambridge studies in comparative politics: Publisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008Description: xiv, 191 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780521887359 (hardback); 0521887356 (hardback); 9780521715256 (pbk.); 0521715253 (pbk.).Subject(s): Failed states -- Africa -- History -- 20th century | Africa -- Politics and government -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 321.09 LOC classification: JC328.7 | .B38 2008Other classification: MI 10000 Electronic version is available via MyiLibrary.
Contents:
Part I. Introduction: 1. Introduction ; 2. From fable to fact -- Part II. Sewing the Seeds: 3. Political legacies ; 4. Policy choices ; 5. Subnational tensions -- Part III. Things Fell Apart: 6. Things fell apart: 7. Conclusion -- Part IV. Appendix.
Summary: From the Publisher: In the later decades of the 20th century, Africa plunged into political chaos. States failed, governments became predators, and citizens took up arms. In When Things Fell Apart, Robert H. Bates advances an explanation of state failure in Africa. In so doing, he not only plumbs the depths of the continent's late-century tragedy, but also the logic of political order and the foundations of the state. This book covers a wide range of territory by drawing on materials from Rwanda, Sudan, Liberia, and Congo. Written to be accessible to the general reader, it is nonetheless a must-read for scholars and policy makers concerned with political conflict and state failure.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JC328.7 .B38 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001952126
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JC328.5 .R46 Revolutionary war: Western response. JC328.6 .E54 2008 From terrorism to politics / JC328.6 .H56 Violence as politics: JC328.7 .B38 2008 When things fell apart : JC328 .D35 2004 Democratic challenges, democratic choices : JC330.3 .G37 1990 On leadership / JC330 .B25 Power and poverty;

Includes bibliographical references (p. 175-186) and index.

Acknowledgments -- Part 1: Introduction -- 1: Introduction -- 2: From fable to fact -- Part 2: Sowing The Seeds -- 3: Political legacies -- 4: Policy choices -- 6: Subnational tensions -- Part 3: Things Fall Apart -- 6: Things fall apart -- 7: Conclusion -- Part 4: Appendix -- Cross-national regressions -- Bibliography -- Index.

From the Publisher: In the later decades of the 20th century, Africa plunged into political chaos. States failed, governments became predators, and citizens took up arms. In When Things Fell Apart, Robert H. Bates advances an explanation of state failure in Africa. In so doing, he not only plumbs the depths of the continent's late-century tragedy, but also the logic of political order and the foundations of the state. This book covers a wide range of territory by drawing on materials from Rwanda, Sudan, Liberia, and Congo. Written to be accessible to the general reader, it is nonetheless a must-read for scholars and policy makers concerned with political conflict and state failure.

Part I. Introduction: 1. Introduction ; 2. From fable to fact -- Part II. Sewing the Seeds: 3. Political legacies ; 4. Policy choices ; 5. Subnational tensions -- Part III. Things Fell Apart: 6. Things fell apart: 7. Conclusion -- Part IV. Appendix.

Electronic version restricted to subscribing institutions.

Electronic version is available via MyiLibrary.

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The resurgence of violence in some parts of Africa has once again fueled pessimism concerning state failure and the inability of civil society to champion government reforms, confront corruption, advocate respect for human rights, and promote and defend democratic processes and institutions. Bates (Harvard Univ.) provides an explanation of state failure in Africa by drawing on the empirical cases of Rwanda, Sudan, Liberia, and Congo. Bates argues that ethnic conflict and the presence of natural resources are not responsible for the surge of violence in Africa, though both are implicated, but the adverse effects of globalization on the continent have contributed enormously to driving these states to become predators and the citizens to pick up arms in defense. He shows how, in order to eradicate predation, corruption, and violence, providing incentives to state leaders will eventually engender peace, accountability, transparency, probity, and good governance. While Bates does a commendable job of presenting a complex topic clearly, concisely, and in a style accessible to the general reader, his book is essential for scholars and policy makers concerned with conflict and state failure in Africa. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. L. O. Imade Shaw University

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