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Moral capital : foundations of British abolitionism / Christopher Leslie Brown.

By: Brown, Christopher Leslie.
Contributor(s): Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, c2006Description: x, 480 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0807830348 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807856983 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807830345; 9780807856987.Subject(s): Slavery -- Great Britain -- History | Abolitionists -- Great Britain -- History | Liberty -- Great Britain -- History | Great Britain -- Race relations | Great Britain -- Foreign relations | Great Britain -- Politics and governmentAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Moral capital.DDC classification: 306.3/620941 Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
I: Values and practice in conflict-- Antislavery without abolitionism -- II: The conflict realized -- The politics of slavery in the years of crisis -- Granville Sharp and the obligations of empire -- III: The search for solutions -- British concepts of emancipation in the age of the American Revolution -- Africa, Africans, and the idea of abolition -- III: The conflict resolved -- British evangelicals and Caribbean slavery after the American war -- The society of friends and the antislavery identity.
Summary: "Revisiting the origins of the British antislavery movement of the late eighteenth century, Christopher Leslie Brown challenges prevailing scholarly arguments that locate the roots of abolitionism in economic determinism or bourgeois humanitarianism. Brown instead connects the shift from sentiment to action to changing views of empire and nation in Britain, particularly the anxieties and dislocations spurred by the American Revolution"--P. [4] of cover.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HT1163 .B76 2006 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001958875

Includes bibliographical references and index.

I: Values and practice in conflict-- Antislavery without abolitionism -- II: The conflict realized -- The politics of slavery in the years of crisis -- Granville Sharp and the obligations of empire -- III: The search for solutions -- British concepts of emancipation in the age of the American Revolution -- Africa, Africans, and the idea of abolition -- III: The conflict resolved -- British evangelicals and Caribbean slavery after the American war -- The society of friends and the antislavery identity.

"Revisiting the origins of the British antislavery movement of the late eighteenth century, Christopher Leslie Brown challenges prevailing scholarly arguments that locate the roots of abolitionism in economic determinism or bourgeois humanitarianism. Brown instead connects the shift from sentiment to action to changing views of empire and nation in Britain, particularly the anxieties and dislocations spurred by the American Revolution"--P. [4] of cover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In what is likely to become a landmark study in the history of British abolitionism, Brown (Rutgers Univ.) provides a nuanced and compelling interpretation of its roots. He argues that the opportunity for fruitful antislavery action was not to be found in an economic rationale or a humanitarian impulse, but rather in a reconceptualization of empire in the wake of the loss of the American colonies. Brown makes it clear that the story of abolitionism was much more complex than many scholars have suggested. He explores the degree to which abolitionism provided a vehicle for its proponents to forward other interests. He places the antislavery cause in the context of imperial developments in the Atlantic World as well as India, and offers a fresh consideration of luminaries of the antislavery cause such as Thomas Clarkson, Granville Sharp, Anthony Benezet, James Ramsay, and William Wilberforce. Brown's analysis of the intersection of abolitionism with the evangelical movement and the Society of Friends also makes a significant contribution to ecclesiastical history of the period. This outstanding and timely study will have broad impact. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. E. L. G. Lyon SUNY Fredonia

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