Lift every voice : the NAACP and the making of the civil rights movement / Patricia Sullivan.

By: Sullivan, Patricia, 1950-Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : New Press : Distributed by Perseus Distribution, 2009Description: xii, 514 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cmISBN: 9781595584465 (hc. : alk. paper); 1595584463 (hc. : alk. paper)Subject(s): National Association for the Advancement of Colored People -- History | Civil rights movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Race relationsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Lift every voice.DDC classification: 973/.0496073 LOC classification: E185.5.N276 | S85 2009
Contents:
Call to action -- Welding the hammers -- Going south: the NAACP in the World War I era -- Making a way: the "new Negro" in postwar America -- Radical visions: the depression years -- Crossroads: protest and politics in the New Deal era -- In the shadow of war: battlefields for freedom -- Justice now: claiming the postwar moment -- The beginning of the end: segregation must go -- "On the threshold of victory" -- Epilogue: Mirror of America.
Summary: Delivers a solidly researched examination of the NAACP's growth and influence, from its inception in 1909 to the present.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
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E185.5 .N276 S85 2009 (Browse shelf) Withdrawn Not For Loan 0000002073997

Call to action -- Welding the hammers -- Going south: the NAACP in the World War I era -- Making a way: the "new Negro" in postwar America -- Radical visions: the depression years -- Crossroads: protest and politics in the New Deal era -- In the shadow of war: battlefields for freedom -- Justice now: claiming the postwar moment -- The beginning of the end: segregation must go -- "On the threshold of victory" -- Epilogue: Mirror of America.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [435]-497) and index.

Delivers a solidly researched examination of the NAACP's growth and influence, from its inception in 1909 to the present.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded 100 years ago by a combination of black and white reformers as a response to the violence directed at African Americans across the country. It gained national recognition by challenging the Wilson administration's attempts to segregate the federal government. By the end of World War I, the NAACP had become a black-dominated organization with 90,000 members. In a comprehensive history of the NAACP through the decision in Brown v. Board of Education, Sullivan (history, Univ. of South Carolina; Days of Hope: Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era) documents how the NAACP used its focus on law and the courts to rise from its humble origins and become the leading civil rights organization in the country. In chronicling the NAACP, Sullivan chronicles the beginnings of the civil rights struggle itself. Verdict Well recommended for both general and academic readers.-Jason Martin, Univ. of Central Florida Lib., Orlando (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Recent histories of the civil rights movement have profiled individuals and organizations overshadowed by earlier works that focused almost exclusively on Martin Luther King Jr. and the events between 1954 and 1965. Among the organizations that became a footnote to the story for racial justice was the NAACP. Sullivan (Univ. of South Carolina) reminds readers of the NAACP's important work and the persons who created the institution and established it as the most influential weapon in attacking segregation. The organizers made one key decision in the first year of the NAACP's existence: they defined southern segregation as a national problem. Through its publication The Crisis, the NAACP publicized issues that concerned the black community, especially highlighting the use of lynching to intimidate African Americans. These articles acted as catalysts for a national debate about segregation. Beginning in the 1930s, the NAACP began a legal challenge to Jim Crow that ultimately led to a series of successful Supreme Court decisions, culminating with the Brown case in 1954 and preparing the stage for the election of Barack Obama as president of the US in 2008. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. D. O. Cullen Collin College

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