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The liberal hour : Washington and the politics of change in the 1960s / G. Calvin Mackenzie & Robert Weisbrot.

By: Mackenzie, G. Calvin.
Contributor(s): Weisbrot, Robert.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Penguin history of American life: Publisher: New York : Penguin Press, 2008Description: 422 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 1594201706; 9781594201707; 9780143115465 (pbk.); 0143115464 (pbk.).Subject(s): Liberalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Political culture -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Social change -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Politics and government -- 1961-1963 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1963-1969 | United States -- Social conditions -- 1960-1980 | United States -- Economic conditions -- 1961-1971Additional physical formats: Online version:: Liberal hour.DDC classification: 973.923
Contents:
America in the postwar years -- Politics and the liberal arc -- The federal colossus -- Free at last -- To protect the planet -- The hour of maximum danger -- A TVA in the Mekong Valley -- The end of the liberal hour -- The durable decade.
Summary: A history of the liberal movement in the 1960s argues that the government was largely responsible for many of the positive changes associated with the period, in an account that evaluates the cultural and political factors that enabled key reforms.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E841 .M223 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001959915

Includes bibliographical references (p. [380]-408) and index.

America in the postwar years -- Politics and the liberal arc -- The federal colossus -- Free at last -- To protect the planet -- The hour of maximum danger -- A TVA in the Mekong Valley -- The end of the liberal hour -- The durable decade.

A history of the liberal movement in the 1960s argues that the government was largely responsible for many of the positive changes associated with the period, in an account that evaluates the cultural and political factors that enabled key reforms.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

From 1963 to 1966, liberalism reigned in the United States, and during this brief time a breathtaking number of laws were passed, creating the enduring legacy of the 1960s, say Mackenzie (government, Colby Coll.; The Politics of Presidential Appointments) and Weisbrot (history, Colby Coll.; Maximum Danger: Kennedy, the Missiles, and the Crisis of American Confidence). Their informed political history reveals how President Kennedy, a liberal work in progress, and President Johnson, "the most skilled and ingenious legislative leader, perhaps of all time," supported by the 89th and 90th Congresses and by the liberal Warren Court, passed such monumental legislation as the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act, Medicare and Medicaid, Head Start, and new laws to protect the environment and to expand aid to higher education. The authors show that liberalism lost public support when it could not meet its overly optimistic goals of ending poverty, healing the racial divide, and, most significantly, financing and winning the Vietnam War. By 1966, liberalism had run its course; the conservative movement gradually emerged to fill the void. This book provides a balance to the many accounts that view the 1960s as most noted for the counterculture, antiwar protestors, and sex, drugs, and rock'n'roll. Strongly recommended for larger public and all academic collections.--Karl Helicher, Upper Merion Twp. Lib., King of Prussia, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Contesting standard interpretations, MacKenzie and Weisbrot (both, Colby College) contend that government operatives themselves altered life in the US during the 1960s. In particular, the federal government knocked down "walls of privileges" associated with white males, accepted greater responsibility in the arena of social welfare, acted to protect the environment, adopted more aggressive strategies regarding economic growth, and ensured greater participation by dissidents and general citizens alike. This important book--one that promises to be seminal--argues that a confluence of developments occurred in which the public was primed for change. Presidents Kennedy and Johnson led the charge and Congress willingly, at least for a brief spell, passed into law a liberal agenda devised over two generations. This liberal hour proved all too brief; quelled by disquieting news from Vietnam, US cities turned into tinderboxes, and inflationary pressures demonstrating the difficulty of having both guns and butter. Hubris proved damaging too, as the ancient afflictions of poverty and racism, among others, could not be overcome. Crippled along the way was the very liberalism that had appeared so ascendant, and yet transformations spawned during the 1960s endured. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. R. C. Cottrell California State University, Chico

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