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Vienna and the fall of the Habsburg Empire : total war and everyday life in World War I / Maureen Healy.

By: Healy, Maureen.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Studies in the social and cultural history of modern warfare: 17.Publisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004Description: xv, 333 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0521831245 (hardback); 9780521831246 (hardback).Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Austria -- Vienna | World War, 1914-1918 -- Social aspects -- Austria -- Vienna | World War, 1914-1918 -- Psychological aspects | War and society -- Austria -- Vienna | Total war | Vienna (Austria) -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Vienna (Austria) -- Politics and government -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 943.6/130442 Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
Food and the politics of sacrifice -- Entertainment, propaganda, and the Vienna war exhibition of 1916-17 -- Censorship, rumors, and denunciation : the crisis of "truth" on the home front -- Sisterhood and citizenship : "Austria's women" in wartime Vienna -- Mobilizing Austria's children for total war -- The "fatherless society" : home-front men and imperial paternalism.
Review: "Maureen Healy examines the collapse of the Habsburg Empire from the perspective of everyday life in the capital city. She argues that a striking feature of "total war" on the home front was the spread of a war mentality to the mundane sites of everyday life - streets, shops, schools, entertainment venues, and apartment buildings. While Habsburg armies waged military campaigns on distant fronts, Viennese civilians (women, children, and "left at home" men) waged a protracted, socially devastating war against one another. Vienna's multi-ethnic population lived together in conditions of serve material shortage and faced near-starvation by 1917. The city fell into civilian mutiny before the state collapsed in 1918. Based on meticulous archival research, including citizens' letters to state authorities, the study offers a new and penetrating look at Habsburg citizenship by showing how ordinary women, men, and children conceived of "Austria" in the Empire's final years."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D539.7 .A9 H43 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001961127

Includes bibliographical references (p. 314-327) and index.

Food and the politics of sacrifice -- Entertainment, propaganda, and the Vienna war exhibition of 1916-17 -- Censorship, rumors, and denunciation : the crisis of "truth" on the home front -- Sisterhood and citizenship : "Austria's women" in wartime Vienna -- Mobilizing Austria's children for total war -- The "fatherless society" : home-front men and imperial paternalism.

"Maureen Healy examines the collapse of the Habsburg Empire from the perspective of everyday life in the capital city. She argues that a striking feature of "total war" on the home front was the spread of a war mentality to the mundane sites of everyday life - streets, shops, schools, entertainment venues, and apartment buildings. While Habsburg armies waged military campaigns on distant fronts, Viennese civilians (women, children, and "left at home" men) waged a protracted, socially devastating war against one another. Vienna's multi-ethnic population lived together in conditions of serve material shortage and faced near-starvation by 1917. The city fell into civilian mutiny before the state collapsed in 1918. Based on meticulous archival research, including citizens' letters to state authorities, the study offers a new and penetrating look at Habsburg citizenship by showing how ordinary women, men, and children conceived of "Austria" in the Empire's final years."--Jacket.

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