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American pentimento : the invention of Indians and the pursuit of riches / Patricia Seed.

By: Seed, Patricia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Public worlds: Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2001Description: xii, 299 p. : map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0816637660 (HC : alk. paper); 9780816637669 (HC : alk. paper).Subject(s): Indians of North America -- Land tenure | Indians -- Colonization | Indians -- Civil rights | Land tenure -- Government policy -- America -- History | Right of property -- America -- History | Europe -- Colonies -- America -- Administration | America -- Colonization | Europe -- Colonies -- United States -- Administration | United States -- ColonizationDDC classification: 970/.00497 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
American Pentimento: An Introduction -- 1. Owning Land by Labor, Money, and Treaty -- 2. Imagining a Waste Land, or, Why Indians Vanish -- 3. Gendering Native Americans: Hunters as Anglo-America's Partial Fiction -- 4. Ownership of Mineral Riches and the Spanish Need for Labor -- 5. Tribute and Social Humiliation: The Cost of Preserving Native Farmlands -- 6. Cannibals: Iberia's Partial Truth -- 7. Sustaining Political Identities: The Moral Boundary between Natives and Colonizers -- 8. Indians in Portuguese America -- 9. Fast Forward: The Impact of Independence on Colonial Structures -- 10. Continuities: Colonial Language and Images Today.
Summary: "The modern regulations and pervading attitudes that control native rights in the Americas may appear unrelated to the European colonial rule, but traces of the colonizers' cultural, religious, and economic agendas remain. Patricia Seed likens this situation to a pentimento - a painting in which traces of older compositions become visible over time -and shows how the exploitation begun centuries ago continues today. Seed examines how the goals of European colonialist in the Americas. The English appropriated land, while the Spanish and Portuguese attempted to eliminate "barbarous" religious behavior and used indigenous labor to take mineral resources. Ultimately, each approach denied native people distinct aspects of their heritage. Seed argues that their differing effects persist, with natives in former English colonies fighting for land rights, while those in former Spanish and Portuguese colonies fight for human dignity."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E59 .L3 S44 2001 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001961036

Includes bibliographical references and index.

American Pentimento: An Introduction -- 1. Owning Land by Labor, Money, and Treaty -- 2. Imagining a Waste Land, or, Why Indians Vanish -- 3. Gendering Native Americans: Hunters as Anglo-America's Partial Fiction -- 4. Ownership of Mineral Riches and the Spanish Need for Labor -- 5. Tribute and Social Humiliation: The Cost of Preserving Native Farmlands -- 6. Cannibals: Iberia's Partial Truth -- 7. Sustaining Political Identities: The Moral Boundary between Natives and Colonizers -- 8. Indians in Portuguese America -- 9. Fast Forward: The Impact of Independence on Colonial Structures -- 10. Continuities: Colonial Language and Images Today.

"The modern regulations and pervading attitudes that control native rights in the Americas may appear unrelated to the European colonial rule, but traces of the colonizers' cultural, religious, and economic agendas remain. Patricia Seed likens this situation to a pentimento - a painting in which traces of older compositions become visible over time -and shows how the exploitation begun centuries ago continues today. Seed examines how the goals of European colonialist in the Americas. The English appropriated land, while the Spanish and Portuguese attempted to eliminate "barbarous" religious behavior and used indigenous labor to take mineral resources. Ultimately, each approach denied native people distinct aspects of their heritage. Seed argues that their differing effects persist, with natives in former English colonies fighting for land rights, while those in former Spanish and Portuguese colonies fight for human dignity."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Seed (Rice Univ.) is recognized for her innovative and comparative scholarship, and the present synthesis does not disappoint. Her argument here is that the contemporary treatment of indigenous peoples in the Americas is strongly influenced by the form of colonialism imposed on them. Some chapters are expertly argued, as in chapter 5, where Seed explains how Islamic tradition shaped the extraction of tribute from Indians in Spanish America. But, despite her stated desire to examine the past with an anthropologist's lens, she fails to consider the production of culture in her analysis. There are also some outright errors: for example, her claim that Brazil did not receive independence until 1888-89. With extensive footnotes and an index, but without benefit of a consolidated bibliography, this title is intended for a sophisticated audience who already knows the literature. Graduate students and faculty. R. M. Delson American Museum of Natural History

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Patricia Seed is professor of history at Rice University</p>

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