Scott Joplin / James Haskins, with Kathleen Benson.

By: Haskins, James, 1941-2005Contributor(s): Benson, Kathleen [joint author.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: Garden City, N.Y. : Doubleday, 1978Edition: 1st edDescription: xiii, 248 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. ; 22 cmISBN: 038511155X; 9780385111553Subject(s): Joplin, Scott, 1868-1917 | Composers -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Scott Joplin.DDC classification: 780/.92/4 | B LOC classification: ML410.J75 | H34
Contents:
The rediscovery of Scott Joplin -- Prelude -- Texarkana -- Itinerant pianist -- Sedalia -- St. Louis -- On the move again -- Treemonisha -- The last years.
Summary: This is the story of Scott Joplin--the man behind Ragtime. From his post-Civil War childhood in Texarkana to his touring days in the honky-tonks of the old South, Joplin was ahead of his time. He sought recognition for ragtime as a black American art form during a time at which America was not yet prepared to honor the syncopated melodies of the bar-room and the brothel.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
ML410.J75 H34 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100310572

Bibliography: p. 229-235.

Includes index.

The rediscovery of Scott Joplin -- Prelude -- Texarkana -- Itinerant pianist -- Sedalia -- St. Louis -- On the move again -- Treemonisha -- The last years.

This is the story of Scott Joplin--the man behind Ragtime. From his post-Civil War childhood in Texarkana to his touring days in the honky-tonks of the old South, Joplin was ahead of his time. He sought recognition for ragtime as a black American art form during a time at which America was not yet prepared to honor the syncopated melodies of the bar-room and the brothel.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Author Jim Haskins was born in Demopolis, Alabama on September 19, 1941. He received a B.A. from Georgetown University in 1960, a B.S. from Alabama State University in 1962, and a M.A. from the University of New Mexico in 1963. After graduation, he became a special education teacher in a public school in Harlem. His first book, Diary of a Harlem School Teacher, was the result of his experience there. He taught at numerous colleges and universities before becoming an English professor at the University of Florida, Gainesville in 1977.

He wrote more than 100 books during his lifetime, ranging from counting books for children to biographies on Rosa Parks, Hank Aaron and Spike Lee. He won numerous awards for his work including the 1976 Coretta Scott King Award for The Story of Stevie Wonder, the 1984 Coretta Scott King Award for Lena Horne, the 1979 ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for Scott Joplin: The Man Who Made Ragtime; and the 1994 Washington Post Children's Book Guide Award. He also won the Carter G. Woodson Award for young adult non-fiction for Black Music in America; The March on Washington; and Carter G. Woodson: The Man Who Put "Black" in American History in 1989, 1994, and 2001, respectively. He died from complications of emphysema on July 6, 2005 at the age of 63.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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