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Bitterly divided : the South's inner Civil War / David Williams.

By: Williams, David, 1959-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : New Press : Distributed by W.W. Norton, 2008Description: 310 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781595581082 (hbk.); 1595581081 (hbk.).Subject(s): Confederate States of America -- Social conditions | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Social aspects | Social conflict -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Social classes -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Southern States -- Race relations -- History -- 19th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Bitterly divided.; Online version:: Bitterly divided.DDC classification: 973.7/13
Contents:
Nothing but divisions among our people -- Rich man's war -- Fighting each other harder than we ever fought the enemy -- Yes, we all shall be free -- Now the wolf has come -- Defeated- by the people at home.
Summary: From the author of the celebrated A People's History of the Civil War, a new account of the Confederacy's collapse from within. The American Confederacy, historian David Williams reveals, was in fact fighting two civil warsan external one that we hear so much about and an internal one about which there is scant literature and virtually no public awareness. From the Confederacy's very beginnings, Williams shows, white southerners were as likely to have opposed secession as supported it, and they undermined the Confederate war effort at nearly every turn. The draft law was nearly impossible to enforce, women defied Confederate authorities by staging food riots, and most of the time two-thirds of the Confederate army was absent with or without leave. In just one of many telling examples in this rich and eye-opening narrative history, Williams shows that, if the nearly half-million southerners who served in the Union military had been with the Confederates, the opposing forces would have been evenly matched. Shattering the myth of wartime southern unity, this riveting new analysis takes on the enduring power of the Confederacy's image and reveals it to be, like the Confederacy itself, a hollow shell.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F214 .W564 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001961432

Includes bibliographical references (p. [275]-291) and index.

Nothing but divisions among our people -- Rich man's war -- Fighting each other harder than we ever fought the enemy -- Yes, we all shall be free -- Now the wolf has come -- Defeated- by the people at home.

From the author of the celebrated A People's History of the Civil War, a new account of the Confederacy's collapse from within. The American Confederacy, historian David Williams reveals, was in fact fighting two civil warsan external one that we hear so much about and an internal one about which there is scant literature and virtually no public awareness. From the Confederacy's very beginnings, Williams shows, white southerners were as likely to have opposed secession as supported it, and they undermined the Confederate war effort at nearly every turn. The draft law was nearly impossible to enforce, women defied Confederate authorities by staging food riots, and most of the time two-thirds of the Confederate army was absent with or without leave. In just one of many telling examples in this rich and eye-opening narrative history, Williams shows that, if the nearly half-million southerners who served in the Union military had been with the Confederates, the opposing forces would have been evenly matched. Shattering the myth of wartime southern unity, this riveting new analysis takes on the enduring power of the Confederacy's image and reveals it to be, like the Confederacy itself, a hollow shell.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Civil War historians frequently fall into two opposing camps when explaining the failure of the Lost Cause--one stressing the Union advantages, the other the South's divisions. Williams (Valdosta State Univ.) takes the latter view and argues that the Lost Cause was lost before it even began. To make his case, he documents internal opposition to the Confederacy by many different kinds of Southerners. Wealthy planters excused themselves from the draft and grew far too much cotton and tobacco, and not nearly enough food. Poor whites scornfully called the conflict a "rich man's war" and rioted in the streets. Others in the mountains of the South formed armed anti-Confederate bands. Factions of Southern Indians defied their tribes' alliances with the Confederacy and vigorously opposed rebel authority. Southern blacks also resisted in increasingly overt ways and escaped by the thousands. The author argues that the South was, in fact, fighting two violent civil wars--an external one and an internal one. In his view, the inner civil war was fueled by the poor's deep resentment of the rich, which would tear Dixie apart and ultimately bring about the downfall of the Confederacy. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. E. M. Thomas Gordon College

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