Divided memory : the Nazi past in the two Germanys / Jeffrey Herf.

By: Herf, Jeffrey, 1947-Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1997Description: 527 p. : ill. ; 24 cmISBN: 0674213033 (alk. paper); 9780674213036 (alk. paper)Subject(s): Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Germany | Antisemitism -- Germany (East) | Antisemitism -- Germany (West) | Historiography -- Germany (East) | Historiography -- Germany (West) | Historiography -- Germany | War criminals -- Germany (East) -- Psychology | War criminals -- Germany (West) -- Psychology | National socialism -- Moral and ethical aspectsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Divided memory.DDC classification: 940.53/18/0943 LOC classification: D804.3 | .H474 1997Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
Multiple restorations and divided memory -- German communism's master narratives of antifascism : Berlin-Moscow- East Berlin, 1928-1945 -- From periphery to center : German communists and the Jewish question, Mexico City, 1942-1945 -- The Nuremberg interregnum : struggles for recognition in East Berlin, 1945-1949 -- Purging "cosmopolitanism" : the Jewish question in East Germany, 1949-1956 -- Memory and policy in East Germany from Ulbricht to Honecker -- The Nuremburg interregnum : divided memory in the Western zones, 1945-1949 -- Atonement, restitution, and justice delayed : West Germany, 1949-1963 -- Politics and memories since the 1960s -- Conclusion.
Summary: A significant new look at the legacy of the Nazi regime, this book exposes the workings of past beliefs and political interests in how - and how differently - the two Germanys have recalled the crimes of Nazism, from the anti-Nazi emigration of the 1930s through the establishment of a day of remembrance for the victims of National Socialism in 1996.Summary: Why, Jeffrey Herf asks, would German politicians raise the specter of crimes at all, in view of the considerable depth and breadth of support the Nazis held during their reign? Why did the public memory of Nazi anti-Jewish persecution and the Holocaust emerge, if selectively, in West Germany, yet was repressed and marginalized in "anti-fascist" East Germany? And how do the politics of left and right come into play in this divided memory? The answers reveal the surprising relationship between how the crimes of Nazism were publicly recalled and how East and West Germany separately evolved a Communist dictatorship and a liberal democracy. This book, for the first time, points to the impact of the Cold War confrontation in both West and East Germany on the public memory of anti-Jewish persecution and the Holocaust.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D804.3 .H474 1997 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001962646

Includes bibliographical references (p. 397-506) and index.

Multiple restorations and divided memory -- German communism's master narratives of antifascism : Berlin-Moscow- East Berlin, 1928-1945 -- From periphery to center : German communists and the Jewish question, Mexico City, 1942-1945 -- The Nuremberg interregnum : struggles for recognition in East Berlin, 1945-1949 -- Purging "cosmopolitanism" : the Jewish question in East Germany, 1949-1956 -- Memory and policy in East Germany from Ulbricht to Honecker -- The Nuremburg interregnum : divided memory in the Western zones, 1945-1949 -- Atonement, restitution, and justice delayed : West Germany, 1949-1963 -- Politics and memories since the 1960s -- Conclusion.

A significant new look at the legacy of the Nazi regime, this book exposes the workings of past beliefs and political interests in how - and how differently - the two Germanys have recalled the crimes of Nazism, from the anti-Nazi emigration of the 1930s through the establishment of a day of remembrance for the victims of National Socialism in 1996.

Why, Jeffrey Herf asks, would German politicians raise the specter of crimes at all, in view of the considerable depth and breadth of support the Nazis held during their reign? Why did the public memory of Nazi anti-Jewish persecution and the Holocaust emerge, if selectively, in West Germany, yet was repressed and marginalized in "anti-fascist" East Germany? And how do the politics of left and right come into play in this divided memory? The answers reveal the surprising relationship between how the crimes of Nazism were publicly recalled and how East and West Germany separately evolved a Communist dictatorship and a liberal democracy. This book, for the first time, points to the impact of the Cold War confrontation in both West and East Germany on the public memory of anti-Jewish persecution and the Holocaust.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Numerous books such as Andrei S. Markovits and Simon Reich's recent The German Predicament (LJ 3/1/97) have examined in some manner the Nazi past versus the present world. Herf (history, Ohio Univ.) questions what Germany has made of its past: Is the memory different in the former East than in the West, and if so, why? Herf examines the papers and writings of the major personalities of the former East and West Germany, such as Walter Ulbricht and Konrad Adenauer. Herf feels that leaders who urged their compatriots to look their history in the face raised issues important to any country. Furthermore, they left behind "an often unpopular, discomforting, demanding, yet precious legacy." This study should be in larger academic libraries or large public libraries with strong collections on the Third Reich and Germany.‘Dennis L. Noble, Sequim, Wash. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Herf treats the divided memory of the Jewish tragedy in the Nazi Holocaust in the two Germanys. He focuses on top leaders in the German states in the formative first postwar decades because these leaders primarily shaped political-moral cultures. Contrary to established opinion, Herf finds that the Holocaust memory was not suppressed in West Germany but raised in public discourse by all leading politicians, although specific blame and prosecution of the perpetrators were soft-pedaled because democratization required broad integration, including former perpetrators. Surprisingly, it was the East German communists, also victims with Jews in the concentration camps, who rejected any responsibility or restitution for Jewish victims, and even blamed capitalist Jews for fascism. In the core of the book Herf reasserts his thesis that the Stalinist purge of Paul Merker (and several of the Jewish functionaries) was due primarily to antisemitism, rather than to Merker's rivalry with Ulbricht or Stalin's Korean-War era anti-Western campaign. While a rising democratic culture let post-1960s West Germans increasingly acknowledge the Holocaust memory, the stubborn East German wall of denial of responsibility remained to the end. All levels. D. Prowe Carleton College

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.