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Outlaw culture : resisting representations / Bell Hooks.

By: Hooks, Bell.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Routledge, 1994Description: vii, 260 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0415908108 (cloth); 9780415908108 (cloth); 0415908116; 9780415908115.Subject(s): African Americans -- Social conditions -- 1975- | United States -- Race relations | African Americans -- Intellectual life | Feminism -- United States | United States -- Social conditions -- 1980- | Inequality | United StatesDDC classification: 305.896/073 LOC classification: E185.86 | .H737 1994Other classification: 71.62 | MR 7100 | MS 3300 | MS 3450
Contents:
Introduction: The Heartbeat of Cultural Revolution -- 1. Power to the Pussy: We Don't Wannabe Dicks in Drag -- 2. Altars of Sacrifice: Re-membering Basquiat -- 3. What's Passion Got To Do With It?: An Interview with Marie-France Alderman -- 4. Seduction and Betrayal: The Crying Game Meets The Bodyguard -- 5. Censorship from Left and Right -- 6. Talking Sex: Beyond the Patriarchal Phallic Imaginary -- 7. Camille Paglia: "Black" Pagan or White Colonizer? -- 8. Dissident Heat: Fire with Fire -- 9. Katie Roiphe: A Little Feminist Excess Goes a Long Way -- 10. Seduced by Violence No More -- 11. Gangsta Culture -- Sexism and Misogyny: Who Will Take the Rap? -- 12. Ice Cube Culture: A Shared Passion for Speaking Truth -- 13. Spending Culture: Marketing the Black Underclass -- 14. Spike Lee Doing Malcolm X: Denying Black Pain -- 15. Seeing and Making Culture: Representing the Poor -- 16. Back to Black: Ending Internalized Racism -- 17. Malcolm X: The Longed-for Feminist Manhood.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185.86 .H737 1994 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001965516
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
E185.86 .G77 1976 The Black family in slavery and freedom, 1750-1925 / E185.86 .H68 1999 A shining thread of hope : E185.86 .H734 1992 Black looks : E185.86 .H737 1994 Outlaw culture : E185.86 .H742 1990 Yearning : E185.86 .J63 Black migration in America : E185.86 .J663 2007 All bound up together :

Includes index.

Introduction: The Heartbeat of Cultural Revolution -- 1. Power to the Pussy: We Don't Wannabe Dicks in Drag -- 2. Altars of Sacrifice: Re-membering Basquiat -- 3. What's Passion Got To Do With It?: An Interview with Marie-France Alderman -- 4. Seduction and Betrayal: The Crying Game Meets The Bodyguard -- 5. Censorship from Left and Right -- 6. Talking Sex: Beyond the Patriarchal Phallic Imaginary -- 7. Camille Paglia: "Black" Pagan or White Colonizer? -- 8. Dissident Heat: Fire with Fire -- 9. Katie Roiphe: A Little Feminist Excess Goes a Long Way -- 10. Seduced by Violence No More -- 11. Gangsta Culture -- Sexism and Misogyny: Who Will Take the Rap? -- 12. Ice Cube Culture: A Shared Passion for Speaking Truth -- 13. Spending Culture: Marketing the Black Underclass -- 14. Spike Lee Doing Malcolm X: Denying Black Pain -- 15. Seeing and Making Culture: Representing the Poor -- 16. Back to Black: Ending Internalized Racism -- 17. Malcolm X: The Longed-for Feminist Manhood.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This latest collection of hooks's (Sisters of the Yam, LJ 8/93) essays does not make for comfortable reading-nor is it meant to. Cogent essays on patriarchy, violence, and racism demand that the reader reexamine familiar assumptions. The author insists that white feminists recognize that the female experience varies greatly and that class and race must therefore be used as categories of analysis. In several essays, including one on Malcolm X, she offers a feminist perspective on the position of black men in society and their attitudes toward black women. In critiques of Camille Paglia, Katie Roiphe, and Naomi Wolf, hooks describes them all as hankering back to a prefeminist time. Other essays include a discussion of violence, the myth of Columbus, and the portrayal of blacks on film. Highly recommended for collections on feminism, gender, and race.-Sharon Firestone, Ross-Blakley Law Lib., Arizona State Univ., Tempe (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Bell Hooks was born Gloria Watkins on September 25, 1952. She grew up in a small Southern community that gave her a sense of belonging as well as a sense of racial separation. She has degrees from Stanford University, the University of Wisconsin, and the University of California at Santa Cruz. She has served as a noted activist and social critic and has taught at numerous colleges. Hooks uses her great-grandmother's name to write under as a tribute to her ancestors. <p> Hooks writes daring and controversial works that explore African-American female identities. In works such as Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism and Talking Back: Thinking Feminist, Thinking Black, she points out how feminism works for and against black women. Oppressed since slavery, black women must overcome the dual odds of race and gender discrimination to come to terms with equality and self-worth. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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