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Her act and deed : women's lives in a rural southern county, 1837-1873 / Angela Boswell.

By: Boswell, Angela, 1965-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Sam Rayburn series on rural life: no. 3.Publisher: College Station : Texas A & M University Press, c2001Edition: 1st ed.Description: xii, 190 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 1585441287 (acid-free paper); 9781585441280 (acid-free paper).Subject(s): Rural women -- Texas -- Colorado County -- History -- 19th century | Colorado County (Tex.) -- Rural conditionsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Her act and deed.DDC classification: 305.42/09764/253091734
Contents:
Women, Work, Family, and Law on the Frontier -- To Find a New Husband: The End of Marriages on the Frontier -- Settling Up: The Ascendance of Antebellum Society -- The Law of the Master: Slave Women -- Civil War -- Long-Awaited Peace: Reconstructing Society -- Widows and Administration -- Divorces Filed and Granted by Gender and Era -- Grounds for Divorce by Gender and Era.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1438 .T4 B67 2001 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001972348

Includes bibliographical references (p. [175]-183) and index.

Ch. 1. Women, Work, Family, and Law on the Frontier -- Ch. 2. To Find a New Husband: The End of Marriages on the Frontier -- Ch. 3. Settling Up: The Ascendance of Antebellum Society -- Ch. 4. The Law of the Master: Slave Women -- Ch. 5. Civil War -- Ch. 6. Long-Awaited Peace: Reconstructing Society -- App. A. Widows and Administration -- App. B. Divorces Filed and Granted by Gender and Era -- App. C. Grounds for Divorce by Gender and Era.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This study of women's lives in 19th-century Colorado County, Texas, indicates how the interplay of law, the ideal of southern womanhood, and the necessities of daily living shaped women's actions. Boswell (Henderson State Univ., Arkansas) analyzed women's participation in a variety of legal actions, including probate, lawsuits, land transactions, and divorces, to study women's reactions to legal restraints and rights, as well as their perceptions of acceptable roles for women. She finds that white and immigrant women embraced the southern ideal that "true women were pious, pure, domestic and submissive," and whenever possible were content to live under the economic, legal, and social control of husbands or other male relatives. Nevertheless, in times of economic or marital stress, or when many men were absent (for instance, during the Civil War), women took on active economic and legal roles out of necessity and without abandoning their ideals of womanhood, even exceeding the limited legal presence allowed them. Free black women also preferred to marry and give their husbands responsibility for the family; slave women, however, had a very different experience. Recommended for academic libraries, graduate levels and above. V. H. Cummins Austin College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Angela Boswell is associate professor of history at Henderson State University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. She received her doctorate from Rice University and has written extensively on the history of Southern women.

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