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Nationalism and the color line in George W. Cable, Mark Twain, and William Faulkner / Barbara Ladd.

By: Ladd, Barbara.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Southern literary studies: Publisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c1996Description: xix, 197 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807120650 (alk. paper); 9780807120651 (alk. paper).Subject(s): American fiction -- Southern States -- History and criticism | American fiction -- White authors -- History and criticism | Cable, George Washington, 1844-1925 -- Criticism and interpretation | National characteristics, American, in literature | Faulkner, William, 1897-1962 -- Criticism and interpretation | Twain, Mark, 1835-1910 -- Criticism and interpretation | American fiction -- West Indian influences | Southern States -- In literature | African Americans in literature | Race relations in literature | Racism in literatureDDC classification: 810.9/975 Other classification: 18.06
Contents:
Race and National Identity in the Work of White Writers -- George W. Cable and American Nationalism -- Mark Twain, American Nationalism, and the Color Line -- William Faulkner and the Discourse of Race and Nation.
Summary: Nationalism and the Color Line in George W. Cable, Mark Twain, and William Faulkner is a strikingly original study of works by three postbellum novelists with strong ties to the Deep South and Mississippi Valley. In it, Barbara Ladd argues that writers like Cable, Twain, and Faulkner cannot be read exclusively within the context of a nationalistically defined "American" literature, but must also be understood in light of the cultural legacy that French and Spanish colonialism bestowed on the Deep South and the Mississippi River Valley, specifically with respect to the very different ways these colonialist cultures conceptualized race, color, and nationality.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS261 .L33 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001970086

Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-189) and index.

1. Race and National Identity in the Work of White Writers -- 2. George W. Cable and American Nationalism -- 3. Mark Twain, American Nationalism, and the Color Line -- 4. William Faulkner and the Discourse of Race and Nation.

Nationalism and the Color Line in George W. Cable, Mark Twain, and William Faulkner is a strikingly original study of works by three postbellum novelists with strong ties to the Deep South and Mississippi Valley. In it, Barbara Ladd argues that writers like Cable, Twain, and Faulkner cannot be read exclusively within the context of a nationalistically defined "American" literature, but must also be understood in light of the cultural legacy that French and Spanish colonialism bestowed on the Deep South and the Mississippi River Valley, specifically with respect to the very different ways these colonialist cultures conceptualized race, color, and nationality.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Taking a new historicist approach, Ladd (Emory Univ.) provides a trenchant explanation of the impact of postbellum US nationalism on Cable, Twain, and Faulkner, selected because they, as Southern writers following Reconstruction, may paradoxically reflect a more nationalistic culture than writers in other regions. Greatly influenced by Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities (CH, Mar'84), this study offers an overview of mixed-blood characters (octoroons, Creoles, mulattoes), with special emphasis on the strong influences of French and Spanish colonialism. A discussion of Cable's optimism and his treatment of American romantic nationalism in his masterpiece The Grandissimes takes up one fourth of the book. Twain, too, embraced optimism in his views of assimilation, but his uses of race change throughout the 1880s. Ladd's critical analysis of Pudd'nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins as a nationalistic US romance is the most valuable section of the book. Less useful is the view of Faulkner's Quentin Compson and Charles Bon as points of reference for radical racism (the African American as sexual savage). A 12-page bibliography is included. Recommended for all academic libraries. S. W. Whyte; Montgomery County Community College

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