The Third Reich and the Holocaust in German historiography : toward the Historikerstreit of the mid-1980s / by Alfred D. Low.

By: Low, Alfred DMaterial type: TextTextSeries: East European monographs: no. 389.Publisher: Boulder : New York : East European Monographs ; Distributed by Columbia University Press, 1994Description: xiv, 255 p. ; 23 cmISBN: 0880332867; 9780880332866Subject(s): Germany -- History -- 1933-1945 -- Historiography | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- HistoriographyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Third Reich and the Holocaust in German historiography.DDC classification: 943.086/072 LOC classification: DD256.5 | .L685 1994D804.3 | .L69 1994Other classification: 15.01
Contents:
I. German Politics and Historiography: About the Third Reich and the Jews, from the Late Nineteenth Century to the Early Post-World War II Ear -- II. The Post-War Germanies and the Rebirth of extremist Nationalism. Allied Occupation and the Revival of German Nationalist Propaganda -- III. The Rise of Historical and Political Revisionism, 1965 to the Early 1980s, and Democratic and Liberal Responses -- IV. The "Historikerstreit," 1986-87 Jurgen Habermas and the Major Protagonists of Neo-Conservatism and Revisionism: B. Nolte, F. Hillgruber, K. Hildebrand, M. Sturmer, and J. Fest -- V. German Scholarly Critique of the "Revisionists" -- VI. Repercussions of the "Historikerstreit" Abroad, Politics and the Holocaust -- Epilogue: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to the Reunification of Germany.
Summary: The past German-Jewish relationship continues to burden the conscience and mind of many Germans as well as to preoccupy the descendants of German Jewry because of its universal significance to the world at large. At issue is the 'historization' of the Third Reich, its place in German history, whether it was a logical outgrowth of major German trends or an aberration. The recent flare-up of the dispute is not surprising. With greater distance from the Third Reich and Nazi atrocities and the German come-back, the rise of German democracy and economy and the increasing role of both democratic as well as neo-conservative and nationalist groups, including neo-Nazis and radical fringe elements, the stage was set for a clash between them.Summary: In some respects the present study is a continuation of an earlier well-received work of the author, Jews in the Eyes of the Germans. From Enlightenment to Imperial Germany, 1979, which traced the German-Jewish relationship from the dawn of Jewish emancipation and Enlightenment to the rise of German racial anti-Semitism.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 227-247) and index.

I. German Politics and Historiography: About the Third Reich and the Jews, from the Late Nineteenth Century to the Early Post-World War II Ear -- II. The Post-War Germanies and the Rebirth of extremist Nationalism. Allied Occupation and the Revival of German Nationalist Propaganda -- III. The Rise of Historical and Political Revisionism, 1965 to the Early 1980s, and Democratic and Liberal Responses -- IV. The "Historikerstreit," 1986-87 Jurgen Habermas and the Major Protagonists of Neo-Conservatism and Revisionism: B. Nolte, F. Hillgruber, K. Hildebrand, M. Sturmer, and J. Fest -- V. German Scholarly Critique of the "Revisionists" -- VI. Repercussions of the "Historikerstreit" Abroad, Politics and the Holocaust -- Epilogue: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to the Reunification of Germany.

The past German-Jewish relationship continues to burden the conscience and mind of many Germans as well as to preoccupy the descendants of German Jewry because of its universal significance to the world at large. At issue is the 'historization' of the Third Reich, its place in German history, whether it was a logical outgrowth of major German trends or an aberration. The recent flare-up of the dispute is not surprising. With greater distance from the Third Reich and Nazi atrocities and the German come-back, the rise of German democracy and economy and the increasing role of both democratic as well as neo-conservative and nationalist groups, including neo-Nazis and radical fringe elements, the stage was set for a clash between them.

In some respects the present study is a continuation of an earlier well-received work of the author, Jews in the Eyes of the Germans. From Enlightenment to Imperial Germany, 1979, which traced the German-Jewish relationship from the dawn of Jewish emancipation and Enlightenment to the rise of German racial anti-Semitism.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Alfred D. Low is professor emeritus of history at Marquette University and was director of its German Institute. This book is his eleventh in German, Austrian, Russian, and diplomatic history.

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