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Empire of liberty : a history of the early Republic, 1789-1815 / Gordon S. Wood.

By: Wood, Gordon S.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Oxford history of the United States (Unnumbered): Publisher: Oxford ; Oxford University Press, 2009Distributor: New York Description: xix, 778 pages, [32] pages of plates : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780195039146 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0195039149 (hardcover : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- Civilization -- 1783-1865 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1789-1815 | United States -- History -- 1783-1815DDC classification: 973.4 Other classification: NK 4600 | NO 2200
Contents:
Rip Van Winkle's America -- Experiment in republicanism -- A monarchical republic -- The Federalist program -- The emergence of the Jeffersonian Republican party -- The French Revolution in America -- John Adams and the few and the many -- The crisis of 1798-1799 -- The Jeffersonian revolution of 1800 -- Republican society -- The Jeffersonian West -- Law and an independent judiciary -- Chief Justice John Marshall and the origins of judicial review -- Republican reforms -- Between slavery and freedom -- The rising glory of America -- Republican religion -- Republican diplomacy -- The War of 1812 -- A world within themselves.
Summary: As part of the Oxford History of the United States series the author offers an account of the early American Republic, ranging from 1789 and the beginning of the national government to the end of the War of 1812. As he reveals, the period was marked by tumultuous change in all aspects of American life, in politics, society, economy, and culture. The men who founded the new government had high hopes for the future, but few of their hopes and dreams worked out quite as they expected. They hated political parties but parties nonetheless emerged. Some wanted the United States to become a great fiscal-military state like those of Britain and France; others wanted the country to remain a rural agricultural state very different from the European states. Instead, by 1815 the United States became something neither group anticipated. Many leaders expected American culture to flourish and surpass that of Europe; instead it became popularized and vulgarized. The leaders also hope to see the end of slavery; instead, despite the release of many slaves and the end of slavery in the North, slavery was stronger in 1815 than it had been in 1789. Many wanted to avoid entanglements with Europe, but instead the country became involved in Europe's wars and ended up waging another war with the former mother country. Still, with a new generation emerging by 1815, most Americans were confident and optimistic about the future of their country. This volumes offers an account of this pivotal era when America took its first unsteady steps as a new and rapidly expanding nation.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E164 .W63 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001969112

Includes bibliographical references (pages 739-752) and index.

Rip Van Winkle's America -- Experiment in republicanism -- A monarchical republic -- The Federalist program -- The emergence of the Jeffersonian Republican party -- The French Revolution in America -- John Adams and the few and the many -- The crisis of 1798-1799 -- The Jeffersonian revolution of 1800 -- Republican society -- The Jeffersonian West -- Law and an independent judiciary -- Chief Justice John Marshall and the origins of judicial review -- Republican reforms -- Between slavery and freedom -- The rising glory of America -- Republican religion -- Republican diplomacy -- The War of 1812 -- A world within themselves.

As part of the Oxford History of the United States series the author offers an account of the early American Republic, ranging from 1789 and the beginning of the national government to the end of the War of 1812. As he reveals, the period was marked by tumultuous change in all aspects of American life, in politics, society, economy, and culture. The men who founded the new government had high hopes for the future, but few of their hopes and dreams worked out quite as they expected. They hated political parties but parties nonetheless emerged. Some wanted the United States to become a great fiscal-military state like those of Britain and France; others wanted the country to remain a rural agricultural state very different from the European states. Instead, by 1815 the United States became something neither group anticipated. Many leaders expected American culture to flourish and surpass that of Europe; instead it became popularized and vulgarized. The leaders also hope to see the end of slavery; instead, despite the release of many slaves and the end of slavery in the North, slavery was stronger in 1815 than it had been in 1789. Many wanted to avoid entanglements with Europe, but instead the country became involved in Europe's wars and ended up waging another war with the former mother country. Still, with a new generation emerging by 1815, most Americans were confident and optimistic about the future of their country. This volumes offers an account of this pivotal era when America took its first unsteady steps as a new and rapidly expanding nation.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In tackling the turbulent years of America's early republic, Wood (Alva O. Way Professor of History Emeritus, Brown Univ.; The Radicalism of the American Revolution) brings his considerable talents to a series that has already produced three Pulitzer Prize winners. Wood's outstandingly eloquent and cerebral analysis commences in the aftermath of the contentious ratification of the U.S. Constitution, a time when republican ideals, from classical virtue to "disinterestedness," remained the principal animating force in the political life of the fledgling republic. Wood sees the initial optimism quickly dashed in the fiery confrontation between the Hamiltonian Federalists seeking to establish an energetic national government and the Jeffersonian Republicans and their "Empire of Liberty." Skillfully traversing seminal topics such as slavery, westward expansion, social leveling, diplomacy, evangelicalism, the arts and sciences, and the transformation of the American legal system, Wood's authoritative and compelling narrative presents a picture of early Americans engaged in pursuit of cultural, social, and economic self-discovery. Most distinctively, Wood avoids the mere celebratory retelling of big events such as the Louisiana Purchase, instead conveying the currents and contours of the era as a whole. VERDICT Wood has provided academics and general readers alike with a brilliant, definitive, and thought-provoking historical synthesis; sure to become indispensable to any study of the era.-Brian Odom, Pelham P.L., AL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Historian Wood (emer., Brown) carries forward the story in his The Radicalism of the American Revolution (CH, Sep'92, 30-0534) and The Creation of the American Republic (CH, Oct'69). His approach is synthesis--almost textbook-like and sometimes predictable--with a grand narrative tracing the tumultuous changes in American society from 1789 to 1815. Territorial expansion, increased population, democratization, and commercial growth were such that "by 1815 Americans had experienced a transformation in the way they related to one another and in the way they perceived themselves and the world around them" (p. 2). With forays into art, literature, religion, economics, and war, the text centers on political personalities, especially Jefferson, about whom Wood writes, "as long as there is a United States he will remain the supreme spokesman for the nation's noblest ideals and highest aspirations" (p. 277). Wood concludes with the War of 1812 and its aftermath. The American character was now defined by middling Americans claiming to be heirs of the revolution in the guise of Franklin's "self made man" (p. 714). Tragically, the American character forged in Jefferson's "empire of liberty" also had deep within it the fatal flaw of slavery. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. G. Spencer Brock University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

History professor and award-winning author Gordon S. Wood was born in Concord, Massachusetts on November 27, 1933. After graduating in 1955 from Tufts University he served in the US Air Force in Japan and earned his master's degree from Harvard University. In 1964, Wood earned his Ph. D. in history from Harvard, and he taught there, as well as at the College of William and Mary and the University of Michigan, before joining the Brown University faculty in 1969. <p> Wood has published a number of articles and books, including The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787, which won the Bancroft Prize and the John H. Dunning Prize in 1970, and The Radicalism of the American Revolution, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History and the Ralph Waldo Emerson Prize in 1993. He has won many other awards in the past five decades from organizations such as the American Historical Association, the New York Historical Society, and the Fraunces Tavern Museum. Wood is a fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. In 2014, his book, The American Revolution: A History, was on the New York Times bestseller list. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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