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Hands to the spindle : Texas women and home textile production, 1822-1880 / by Paula Mitchell Marks ; illustrated by Walle Conoly.

By: Marks, Paula Mitchell, 1951-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Clayton Wheat Williams Texas life series: no. 5.Publisher: College Station : Texas A & M University Press, c1996Edition: 1st ed.Description: xviii, 133 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0890966990; 9780890966990.Subject(s): Women textile workers -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Women weavers -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Hand weaving -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Spinning -- Texas -- History -- 19th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Hands to the spindle.DDC classification: 331.4/877/00976409034 Other classification: 15.85 | 15.87 | 7,26
Contents:
1. Legacy and Contexts -- 2. The Early Years, 1822-1836 -- 3. The Republic and Early Statehood Years, 1836-1860 -- 4. The Civil War and the West Texas Frontier, 1860-1880.
Summary: In nineteenth-century Texas women's hands often created the fabrics their families wore, the blankets used to cover their tired bodies, and the textiles that furnished their homes. Through spinning, weaving, dyeing, and knitting of clothing and linens, women displayed their abilities and their dreams of a better future. These day-to-day activities of Texas women spinners and weavers come to life in award-winning author Paula Mitchell Marks's Hands to the Spindle. The hum.Summary: Of the spinning wheel and the clatter of the loom provided regular accompaniment to the lives of many Texas women immigrants and their families. Producing much-needed garments and cloth also provided an escape from the worries and isolation of frontier life. One early chronicler, Mary Crownover Rabb, kept her spinning wheel whistling all day and most of the night because the spinning kept her "from hearing the Indians walking around hunting mischief." Through the stories.Summary: Of real women and an overview of their textile crafts, Paula Mitchell Marks introduces readers to a functional art rarely practiced in our more hurried times. Photographs of some of their actual handiwork and evocative pen sketches of women at work and the tools and dye plants they used, delicately drawn by artist Walle Conoly, bring the words to life.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HD6073 .T42 U55 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001967785

Includes bibliographical references (p. [121]-127) and index.

1. Legacy and Contexts -- 2. The Early Years, 1822-1836 -- 3. The Republic and Early Statehood Years, 1836-1860 -- 4. The Civil War and the West Texas Frontier, 1860-1880.

In nineteenth-century Texas women's hands often created the fabrics their families wore, the blankets used to cover their tired bodies, and the textiles that furnished their homes. Through spinning, weaving, dyeing, and knitting of clothing and linens, women displayed their abilities and their dreams of a better future. These day-to-day activities of Texas women spinners and weavers come to life in award-winning author Paula Mitchell Marks's Hands to the Spindle. The hum.

Of the spinning wheel and the clatter of the loom provided regular accompaniment to the lives of many Texas women immigrants and their families. Producing much-needed garments and cloth also provided an escape from the worries and isolation of frontier life. One early chronicler, Mary Crownover Rabb, kept her spinning wheel whistling all day and most of the night because the spinning kept her "from hearing the Indians walking around hunting mischief." Through the stories.

Of real women and an overview of their textile crafts, Paula Mitchell Marks introduces readers to a functional art rarely practiced in our more hurried times. Photographs of some of their actual handiwork and evocative pen sketches of women at work and the tools and dye plants they used, delicately drawn by artist Walle Conoly, bring the words to life.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this brief but extremely well documented study Marks presents a narrative history of the domestic textile industry in 19th-century Texas. She relies heavily on primary accounts (usually written by women) that describe the processes of spinning, weaving, and dyeing, as well as the use of the final products. The four succinct chapters chronicle the widespread continuation of the home textile industry by Anglo pioneers and their slaves in Texas, long after such production had ceased to be popular, or even to exist, in eastern areas of the US. Ironically, just as the textile production trades began to decline in Texas (thanks to the rise of a commercial economy featuring manufactured thread and fabric) along came the Civil War, which plunged the women back into textile self-sufficiency. Although the author does a much better job than most historians in dealing with material culture, her lack of an in-depth understanding of the field shows up periodically. Nonetheless, with its illustrations, and a bibliography, this book should be a help to students, researchers, and 20th-century practitioners of the textile arts. All levels. J. M. Lewis University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Paula Mitchell Marks is a professor of history at Saint Edward's University in Austin. She has written highly acclaimed books on western history, including Turn Your Eyes Toward Texas: Pioneers Sam and Mary Maverick, also published by Texas A&M University Press.

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