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People of the American frontier : the coming of the American revolution / Walter S. Dunn, Jr.

By: Dunn, Walter S. (Walter Scott), 1928-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2005Description: xi, 235 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0275981819 (alk. paper); 9780275981815 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Frontier and pioneer life -- United States | United States -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775 | United States -- Social conditions -- To 1865 | United States -- Ethnic relations | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Causes
Contents:
The Indians -- The French farmers -- The French traders -- Settlers -- The New York traders -- The Pennsylvania traders -- The merchants -- Illinois : farmers, traders, merchants -- Women and home life -- Slaves and indentured servants -- The army -- Conclusion.
Summary: Life on the frontier in the decades before the Revolution was extremely difficult and uncertain. It was a world populated by Native Americans, merchants, fur traders, land speculators, soldiers and settlers including women, slaves, and indentured servants. Each of these groups depended on the others in some way, and collectively they formed the patchwork that was life on the frontier. Using a wealth of material culled from primary sources, Dunn paints a vivid picture of a world caught up in the winds of change, a world poised on the edge of revolution.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E179.5 .D95 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001970037

Includes bibliographical references (p. [225]-228) and index.

The Indians -- The French farmers -- The French traders -- Settlers -- The New York traders -- The Pennsylvania traders -- The merchants -- Illinois : farmers, traders, merchants -- Women and home life -- Slaves and indentured servants -- The army -- Conclusion.

Life on the frontier in the decades before the Revolution was extremely difficult and uncertain. It was a world populated by Native Americans, merchants, fur traders, land speculators, soldiers and settlers including women, slaves, and indentured servants. Each of these groups depended on the others in some way, and collectively they formed the patchwork that was life on the frontier. Using a wealth of material culled from primary sources, Dunn paints a vivid picture of a world caught up in the winds of change, a world poised on the edge of revolution.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book badly needed an editor. It treats many topics, most of which could be covered by the rubric "life in frontier North America in the mid-18th century." Thus, independent researcher Dunn informs readers about women, Indians, the French, English farmers, merchants, slaves, agriculture, diet, and much more. He devotes much more than average attention to commerce on the frontier, especially the fur trade and the supply of British army garrisons. The book's subtitle, however, promises some extended treatment of the coming of the American Revolution, with the expectation that the treatment will synthesize all the disjointed topics in the book. That does not occur. The Revolution hardly appears in the book, and the author's brief assertion about the link between its coming and any of his other topics is feeble and flawed. There is little scholarly apparatus: no citations but a brief select bibliography and, in some chapters but not others, some suggested readings. The prose is not engaging and is occasionally juvenile. Dunn does not seem to know what audience he wrote for--scholars or laypeople; he missed both. ^BSumming Up: Not recommended. J. D. Marietta University of Arizona

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Walter S. Dunn, Jr. is an independent writer and researcher. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His recent publications include Opening New Markets: The British Army and the American Frontier, 1764-1768 (2002).</p>

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