Slave nation : how slavery united the colonies & sparked the American Revolution / Alfred W. Blumrosen and Ruth G. Blumrosen ; introduction by Eleanor Holmes Norton.

By: Blumrosen, Alfred WContributor(s): Blumrosen, Ruth GMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Naperville, Ill. : Sourcebooks, c2005Description: xv, 336 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cmISBN: 1402204000 (alk. paper); 9781402204005 (alk. paper); 1402206976 (pbk.); 9781402206979 (pbk.)Subject(s): Slavery -- United States -- History -- 18th century | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Causes | African Americans -- History -- To 1863DDC classification: 973.3/11 LOC classification: E446 | .B58 2005Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Somerset's journey sparks the American Revolution -- The tinderbox -- Virginia responds to the Somerset Decision -- The Virginia Resolution unites the Colonies and leads to the First Continental Congress in 1774 -- John Adams supports the South on slavery -- Colonies claim independence from Parliament -- The immortal ambiguity "all men are created equal" -- The Articles of Confederation reject Somerset and protect slavery -- The lure of the West : slavery protected in the Territories -- Deadlock over slavery in the Constitutional Convention -- A slave-free Northwest Territory -- Cementing the bargain : ratification by Virginia and the First Congress -- How then should we view the Founding Fathers?
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E446 .B58 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001969294
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler shelves, Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
E445.T47 S52 The Slave narratives of Texas / E445.V8 M67 1995 American slavery, American freedom : E446 .B49 1998 Many thousands gone : E446 .B58 2005 Slave nation : E446 .J665 2008 White cargo : E446 .J67 The white man's burden : E446 .P82 1970 Anti-slavery opinions before the year 1800.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [267]-273) and index.

Somerset's journey sparks the American Revolution -- The tinderbox -- Virginia responds to the Somerset Decision -- The Virginia Resolution unites the Colonies and leads to the First Continental Congress in 1774 -- John Adams supports the South on slavery -- Colonies claim independence from Parliament -- The immortal ambiguity "all men are created equal" -- The Articles of Confederation reject Somerset and protect slavery -- The lure of the West : slavery protected in the Territories -- Deadlock over slavery in the Constitutional Convention -- A slave-free Northwest Territory -- Cementing the bargain : ratification by Virginia and the First Congress -- How then should we view the Founding Fathers?

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Civil rights lawyers Alfred and Ruth Blumrosen use the Somerset case of 1772, which freed all slaves in Britain, to illustrate how the price of freedom from English rule ensured continued bondage for slaves in the American South. The Blumrosens argue that Southerners feared that the ruling might be extended to the entire empire and therefore joined the move to win independence from Britain. Many of the Founding Fathers, most notably John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, were willing to compromise their principles to assure support from the Southern colonies. The Blumrosens systematically review some of the most important documents of the revolutionary period, including the Virginia Resolution, the Declaration of Independence, and the Articles of Confederation, to discuss the political maneuverings and subtle revisions and rewordings that protected slavery without appearing hypocritical to the world. Although the authors occasionally get off track, this well-researched book is sure to be controversial. Recommended for libraries with an interest in the revolutionary period and slavery.-Robert Flatley, Kutztown Univ., PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This important book joins a wealth of recent scholarship illustrating that slavery was a core value in creating the movement for independence in the US. Rutgers Law professors A. Blumrosen and R. Blumrosen (now deceased) illustrate how the Somerset case, which declared that English law did not compel a slave to return to his master, read together with Parliament's Declaratory Act, giving Parliament the right to regulate its North American colonies "in all cases whatsoever," moved southerners to support the nascent movement for American independence. This brought southerners into common cause with activist citizens of Massachusetts to spur on the American Revolution. Even the drafting of the Constitution was halted until southerners were satisfied that slavery would exist in all territories save those where Congress did not actively exclude it, which northern interests required above the Ohio River. Solidly researched, especially in legal history, the book fails only to identify itself expressly in the scholarship of the Revolution and early republic. Notwithstanding that, its powerful thesis, taken alongside the research of Edmund Morgan, Paul Finkelman, and Donald Fehrenbacher, rightly places slavery at the center of the founding of the republic. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. E. R. Crowther Adams State College

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