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Where have all the soldiers gone? : the transformation of modern Europe / James J. Sheehan.

By: Sheehan, James J.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Boston : Mariner Books/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009Edition: 1st Mariner Books ed.Description: xx, 284 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780547086330 (pbk.); 0547086334 (pbk.).Subject(s): Europe -- History -- 20th century | Europe -- Economic conditions -- 1945- | Europe -- Defenses | War and society -- Europe | Politics and warDDC classification: 940.55
Contents:
Prologue: War and peace in the twentieth century -- pt. 1. Living in peace, preparing for war, 1900-1914. "Without war, there would be no state" ; Pacifism and militarism ; Europeans in a violent world -- pt. 2. A world made by war, 1914-1945. War and revolution ; The twenty-year truce ; The last European war -- pt. 3. States without war. The foundations of the postwar world ; The rise of the civilian state ; Why Europe will not become a superpower -- Epilogue: The future of the civilian state.
Summary: Stanford historian Sheehan charts what is perhaps the most radical shift in Europe's history. For centuries, nations defined themselves by their willingness and ability to wage war. But after World War II, Europe began to redefine statehood, rejecting ballooning defense budgets in favor of material well-being, social stability, and economic growth. Sheehan reveals how and why this happened, and what it means for America as well as the rest of the world.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D425 .S54 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001967819

Stanford historian Sheehan charts what is perhaps the most radical shift in Europe's history. For centuries, nations defined themselves by their willingness and ability to wage war. But after World War II, Europe began to redefine statehood, rejecting ballooning defense budgets in favor of material well-being, social stability, and economic growth. Sheehan reveals how and why this happened, and what it means for America as well as the rest of the world.--From publisher description.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-260) and index.

Prologue: War and peace in the twentieth century -- pt. 1. Living in peace, preparing for war, 1900-1914. "Without war, there would be no state" ; Pacifism and militarism ; Europeans in a violent world -- pt. 2. A world made by war, 1914-1945. War and revolution ; The twenty-year truce ; The last European war -- pt. 3. States without war. The foundations of the postwar world ; The rise of the civilian state ; Why Europe will not become a superpower -- Epilogue: The future of the civilian state.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James J. Sheehan is the Dickason Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University and a former president of the American Historical Association. The author of several books on German history, he has written for the New York Times Book Review and the Times Literary Supplement, among other publications. He lives in Berkeley, California.

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