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Digital diaspora : a race for cyberspace / Anna Everett.

By: Everett, Anna, 1954-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: SUNY series, cultural studies in cinema/video: Publisher: Albany : SUNY Press, c2009Description: xii, 248 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780791476734 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0791476731 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780791476741 (pbk. : alk. paper); 079147674X (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Computers -- Social aspects -- United States | African Americans and mass media -- United States | Digital media -- Social aspects -- United States | African diasporaDDC classification: 303.48/34
Contents:
Toward a theory of the egalitarian technosphere : how wide is the digital divide -- Digital women : the case of the million woman march online and on television -- New black public spheres : the case of the black press in the age of digital reproduction -- Serious play : playing with race in contemporary culture -- The revolution will be digitized : reimaging Africanity in cyberspace.
Summary: Traces the rise of black participation in cyberspace, particularly during the early years of the Internet. The author challenges the problematic historical view of black people as quintessential information-age outsiders or poster children for the digital divide by uncovering their early technolust and repositioning them as eager technology adopters and consumers, and thus as co-constituent elements in the information technology revolution. Offers case studies that include lessons learned from early adoption of the Internet by the Association of Nigerians Living Abroad and their Niajanet virtual community, the grassroots organizing efforts that led to the Million Woman March, the migration of several historical black presses online, and an interventionist critique of race in contemporary video games.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
QA76.9 .C66 E95 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001971662

Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-236) and index.

Traces the rise of black participation in cyberspace, particularly during the early years of the Internet. The author challenges the problematic historical view of black people as quintessential information-age outsiders or poster children for the digital divide by uncovering their early technolust and repositioning them as eager technology adopters and consumers, and thus as co-constituent elements in the information technology revolution. Offers case studies that include lessons learned from early adoption of the Internet by the Association of Nigerians Living Abroad and their Niajanet virtual community, the grassroots organizing efforts that led to the Million Woman March, the migration of several historical black presses online, and an interventionist critique of race in contemporary video games.

Toward a theory of the egalitarian technosphere : how wide is the digital divide -- Digital women : the case of the million woman march online and on television -- New black public spheres : the case of the black press in the age of digital reproduction -- Serious play : playing with race in contemporary culture -- The revolution will be digitized : reimaging Africanity in cyberspace.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Books about the Internet are plentiful, but Everett (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara) has written one of the best, most-informative works on the black experience--in particular that of African diasporic populations--in cyberspace. After an introductory chapter, the author delves into the issue of the digital divide and the rise of black participation online. She devotes the remaining four chapters to case studies that highlight black "technomastery" of the Internet. Using the Million Woman March (1997) as her example, Everett discusses how black women overcame the disinterest of the national media and mobilized via the Internet--an effort that resulted in a successful demonstration. She discusses the migration of established black presses into cyberspace to better engage a new generation of blacks disinterested in traditional black newspapers. Perhaps the most significant chapter is that on race, video gaming, and the reproduction of racist ideologies; here she is adept in questioning the ability of video games to challenge existing norms of blacks in the media. Everett concludes by exploring the reimaging of "Africanity" in cyberspace and how "afrogeeks" and black "cyberflaneurs" have increased blacks' adoption of cybertechnologies. A fascinating book for anyone interested in communications/media or African studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, researchers/faculty, professionals; general readers. J. Craine California State University, Northridge

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Anna Everett is Professor of Film and Media Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her books include Learning Race and Ethnicity: Youth and Digital Media; New Media: Theories and Practices of Digitextuality; and Returning the Gaze: A Genealogy of Black Film Criticism, 1909-1949.

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