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Honest broker? : the national security advisor and presidential decision making / John P. Burke.

By: Burke, John P, 1953-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Joseph V. Hughes, Jr. and Holly O. Hughes series on the presidency and leadership: Publisher: College Station : Texas A & M University Press, c2009Edition: 1st ed.Description: 492 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781603440981 (cloth : alk. paper); 1603440984 (cloth : alk. paper); 9781603441025 (pbk. : alk. paper); 1603441026 (pbk. : alk. paper).Other title: National security advisor and presidential decision making.Subject(s): United States. Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs -- Decision making -- History | National Security Council (U.S.) -- Decision making -- History | Presidents -- United States -- Decision making -- History -- 20th century | National security -- United States -- Decision making -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 355/.033573 LOC classification: UA23.15 | .B87 2009
Contents:
Introduction-the case for the honest broker role -- The foundation of honest brokerage: Truman's executive secretaries, Eisenhower's special assistants -- The decline of honest brokerage: Bundy as NSC advisor -- The costs of absent brokerage: Kissinger as NSC advisor -- The benefits of balanced brokerage: Scowcroft as NSC advisor -- Weak brokerage, insurgency, and recovery: the Reagan NSC advisors -- The costs of failed brokerage: Rice as NSC advisor -- Conclusions -- Appendix A: Assistants to the president for national security affairs (NSC advisors) -- Since 1953 -- Appendix B: The others: Rostow, Brzezinski, Lake, Berger, and Hadley -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: Examines the history of the office of national security in the United States from its inception, describing how the role of the national security advisor to the president has evolved between the 1950s and 2000s, and discusses the influence of the national security advisor on the commander in chief's decisions.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
UA23.15 .B87 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001972769

Includes bibliographical references (p. [445]-462) and index.

Introduction-the case for the honest broker role -- The foundation of honest brokerage: Truman's executive secretaries, Eisenhower's special assistants -- The decline of honest brokerage: Bundy as NSC advisor -- The costs of absent brokerage: Kissinger as NSC advisor -- The benefits of balanced brokerage: Scowcroft as NSC advisor -- Weak brokerage, insurgency, and recovery: the Reagan NSC advisors -- The costs of failed brokerage: Rice as NSC advisor -- Conclusions -- Appendix A: Assistants to the president for national security affairs (NSC advisors) -- Since 1953 -- Appendix B: The others: Rostow, Brzezinski, Lake, Berger, and Hadley -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

Examines the history of the office of national security in the United States from its inception, describing how the role of the national security advisor to the president has evolved between the 1950s and 2000s, and discusses the influence of the national security advisor on the commander in chief's decisions.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Burke's newest work is an excellent addition to the literature on executive policy making and the role of advisors in policy implementation. Burke provides a history of the position from its early stages in the Truman and Eisenhower administrations through the George W. Bush presidency. Burke (Univ. of Vermont) utilizes six case studies, all of which are diligently researched and documented, to illustrate that the individual filling the position of the national security advisor (NSA) and the institutional design of the position are key components affecting the impact of the advisor. According to Burke's definition, there are benefits to the NSA acting as an "honest broker," that is, as more of a policy filter than a position taker for the presidency. An honest broker, unlike advisors with personal agendas, should benefit the president by avoiding scandal (Iran-Contra) or egotism (Kissinger) that leads to the downfall of a president. This book should be considered a resource for all students of the executive branch. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. T. T. Gibson Monmouth College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John P. Burke is a professor of political science at the University of Vermont in Burlington. He has written seven books and is a former winner of the American Political Science Association's Richard Neustadt Award for the best book on the American Presidency. His Ph.D. is from Princeton University.<br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br>

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