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Human rights, perestroika, and the end of the Cold War / Anatoly Adamishin and Richard Schifter.

By: Adamishin, A. L.
Contributor(s): Schifter, Richard.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Washington, D.C. : United States Institute of Peace Press, 2009Description: xx, 297 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781601270405 (pbk. : alk. paper); 1601270402 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Adamishin, A. L | Schifter, Richard | United States -- Foreign relations -- Soviet Union | Soviet Union -- Foreign relations -- United States | Human rights -- Soviet Union | Perestroĭka | Soviet Union -- Politics and government -- 1985-1991 | Diplomats -- Soviet Union -- Biography | Diplomats -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Human rights, perestroika, and the end of the Cold War.DDC classification: 323.0947/09048 LOC classification: JZ1480.A57 S653 2009
Contents:
Foreword / Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev -- Foreword / George P. Shultz -- Acknowledgments -- Timeline, 1981-1991 -- Introduction -- 1. The making of unwitting human rights officials -- 2. Soviet-U.S. relations and human rights before Perestroika -- 3. Enter Gorbachev -- 4. The human rights agenda -- 5. Vienna -- 6. The end of Perestroika -- 7. Concluding thoughts.
Review: "This volume takes the reader behind the scenes on both sides of the Cold War as two men form an unlikely partnership to help transform Soviet-American relations. When U.S. assistant secretary of state Richard Schifter first met Soviet deputy foreign minister Anatoly Adamishin to discus human rights, the Reagan administration was still skeptical of Gorbachev's reformist credentials. But skepticism soon gave way not just to belief but to active support. Like their immediate superiors George Shultz and Eduard Shevardnadze, Schifter and Adamishin became partners in rapprochement. Together, they helped free political prisoners, ease emigration, support perestroika against its domestic enemies, and contribute to the mutual trust that allowed the Cold War to end swiftly and peacefully."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JZ1480 .A57 S653 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001969252

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Foreword / Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev -- Foreword / George P. Shultz -- Acknowledgments -- Timeline, 1981-1991 -- Introduction -- 1. The making of unwitting human rights officials -- 2. Soviet-U.S. relations and human rights before Perestroika -- 3. Enter Gorbachev -- 4. The human rights agenda -- 5. Vienna -- 6. The end of Perestroika -- 7. Concluding thoughts.

"This volume takes the reader behind the scenes on both sides of the Cold War as two men form an unlikely partnership to help transform Soviet-American relations. When U.S. assistant secretary of state Richard Schifter first met Soviet deputy foreign minister Anatoly Adamishin to discus human rights, the Reagan administration was still skeptical of Gorbachev's reformist credentials. But skepticism soon gave way not just to belief but to active support. Like their immediate superiors George Shultz and Eduard Shevardnadze, Schifter and Adamishin became partners in rapprochement. Together, they helped free political prisoners, ease emigration, support perestroika against its domestic enemies, and contribute to the mutual trust that allowed the Cold War to end swiftly and peacefully."--Jacket.

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CHOICE Review

The Soviet Union during the years of Mikhail Gorbachev's rule (1985-91) was the site of fascinating events as human rights developed and the country turned away from totalitarianism. However, this effort at reform backfired as the system collapsed, the Soviet Union ceased to exist, and Gorbachev was removed from office. The authors of this joint memoir were insiders and are therefore able to provide revealing insights into this fascinating historical period. Their analysis is a useful top-down presentation since Adamishin served Soviet foreign minister Eduard Shevardnadze and Schifter was the chief human rights representative of US Secretary of State George Shultz. Their perspectives are nevertheless somewhat limited as they do not delve into grassroots activism on the part of Soviet and US human rights interest groups. The authors concur that Gorbachev was a committed reformer, but that he was forced to retrench once the US failed to provide sufficient backing for his agenda. They portray George H. W. Bush and members of his administration as the culprits in this regard, claiming that they did not believe that Gorbachev's reforms could succeed and favored Boris Yeltsin over Gorbachev. Such an interpretation is both interesting and controversial. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate, research, and professional collections. A. Klinghoffer emeritus, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden

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