Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Whitewashed : America's invisible Middle Eastern minority / John Tehranian.

By: Tehranian, John.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Critical America: Publisher: New York : New York University Press, [2009]Copyright date: ©2009Description: ix, 246 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780814783061 (cloth : alk. paper); 0814783066 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Arab Americans -- Social conditions | Iranian Americans -- Social conditions | Turkish Americans -- Social conditions | Arab Americans -- Legal status, laws, etc | Iranian Americans -- Legal status, laws, etc | Turkish Americans -- Legal status, laws, etc | Whites -- Race identity -- United States | Racism -- United States | Race discrimination -- United States | United States -- Race relationsDDC classification: 305.89/4073
Contents:
Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Price of the ticket -- 1: Constructing caucasians: a brief history of whiteness -- 2: Performing whiteness: law, dramaturgy, and the paradox of Middle Eastern racial classification -- 3: From friendly foreigner to enemy race: selective racialization, covering, and the negotiation of Middle Eastern American identity -- 4: Last minstrel show? Middle Easterners in media -- 5: Threat level orange: the war on terrorism and the assault on Middle Eastern civil rights -- 6: Lifting the veil: thinking about reform -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index -- About the author.
Summary: From the Publisher: Middle Easterners: Sometimes White, Sometimes Not-an article by John Tehranian. The Middle Eastern question lies at the heart of the most pressing issues of our time: the war in Iraq and on terrorism, the growing tension between preservation of our national security and protection of our civil rights, and the debate over immigration, assimilation, and our national identity. Yet paradoxically, little attention is focused on our domestic Middle Eastern population and its place in American society. Unlike many other racial minorities in our country, Middle Eastern Americans have faced rising, rather than diminishing, degrees of discrimination over time; a fact highlighted by recent targeted immigration policies, racial profiling, a war on terrorism with a decided racialist bent, and growing rates of job discrimination and hate crime. Oddly enough, however, Middle Eastern Americans are not even considered a minority in official government data. Instead, they are deemed white by law. In Whitewashed, John Tehranian combines his own personal experiences as an Iranian American with an expert's analysis of current events, legal trends, and critical theory to analyze this bizarre Catch-22 of Middle Eastern racial classification. He explains how American constructions of Middle Eastern racial identity have changed over the last two centuries, paying particular attention to the shift in perceptions of the Middle Easterner from friendly foreigner to enemy alien, a trend accelerated by the tragic events of September 11. Focusing on the contemporary immigration debate, the war on terrorism, media portrayals of Middle Easterners, and the processes of creating racial stereo-types, Tehranian argues that, despite its many successes, the modern civil rights movement has not done enough to protect the liberties of Middle Eastern Americans. By following how concepts of whiteness have transformed over time, Whitewashed forces readers to rethink and question some of their most deeply held assumptions about race in American society.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E184 .A65 T45 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001968924

Includes bibliographical references (pages 185-226) and index.

Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Price of the ticket -- 1: Constructing caucasians: a brief history of whiteness -- 2: Performing whiteness: law, dramaturgy, and the paradox of Middle Eastern racial classification -- 3: From friendly foreigner to enemy race: selective racialization, covering, and the negotiation of Middle Eastern American identity -- 4: Last minstrel show? Middle Easterners in media -- 5: Threat level orange: the war on terrorism and the assault on Middle Eastern civil rights -- 6: Lifting the veil: thinking about reform -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index -- About the author.

From the Publisher: Middle Easterners: Sometimes White, Sometimes Not-an article by John Tehranian. The Middle Eastern question lies at the heart of the most pressing issues of our time: the war in Iraq and on terrorism, the growing tension between preservation of our national security and protection of our civil rights, and the debate over immigration, assimilation, and our national identity. Yet paradoxically, little attention is focused on our domestic Middle Eastern population and its place in American society. Unlike many other racial minorities in our country, Middle Eastern Americans have faced rising, rather than diminishing, degrees of discrimination over time; a fact highlighted by recent targeted immigration policies, racial profiling, a war on terrorism with a decided racialist bent, and growing rates of job discrimination and hate crime. Oddly enough, however, Middle Eastern Americans are not even considered a minority in official government data. Instead, they are deemed white by law. In Whitewashed, John Tehranian combines his own personal experiences as an Iranian American with an expert's analysis of current events, legal trends, and critical theory to analyze this bizarre Catch-22 of Middle Eastern racial classification. He explains how American constructions of Middle Eastern racial identity have changed over the last two centuries, paying particular attention to the shift in perceptions of the Middle Easterner from friendly foreigner to enemy alien, a trend accelerated by the tragic events of September 11. Focusing on the contemporary immigration debate, the war on terrorism, media portrayals of Middle Easterners, and the processes of creating racial stereo-types, Tehranian argues that, despite its many successes, the modern civil rights movement has not done enough to protect the liberties of Middle Eastern Americans. By following how concepts of whiteness have transformed over time, Whitewashed forces readers to rethink and question some of their most deeply held assumptions about race in American society.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book is a compelling study of one of the critical issues of our time: the debate regarding the issues of assimilation, immigration, and national identity. Tehranian (Chapman Univ.) is a professor of law, a litigator, and a Middle Eastern American who has experienced the stigma of his origins and thus writes knowledgeably about the problem. Citing numerous court cases, Tehranian leads readers through the labyrinth of white identity in the US and discusses where Middle Eastern citizens fit in this puzzle. He challenges the civil rights problems that still exist and offers some possible solutions, such as reforming media images of Middle Eastern people. The increasing interaction between the Middle East and the US indicates that it is crucial to recognize the social forces that drive people and to deconstruct those images in order to free members of the public to create their own images based upon individual impressions. Tehranian raises many questions concerning Americans' identity and racial consciousness. A well-written and extremely readable book suited to general readers as well as faculty and researchers. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. S. J. Zuber-Chall Washburn University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.