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Latino spin : public image and the whitewashing of race / Arlene Dávila.

By: Dávila, Arlene M, 1965-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : New York University Press, [2008]Copyright date: ©2008Description: viii, 211 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780814720066 (cl : alk. paper); 0814720064 (cl : alk. paper); 9780814720073 (pb : alk. paper); 0814720072 (pb : alk. paper).Subject(s): Hispanic Americans -- Social conditions | Hispanic Americans in mass media | Hispanic Americans in popular culture | United States -- Race relationsDDC classification: 973/.0468
Contents:
Here comes the Latino middle class -- Latinos : "the new Republicans (they just don't know it)" -- The Hispanic consumer: that's "a lot of dollars, cars, diapers, and food" -- The Times-Squaring of el barrio : on mega-projects, spin, and "community consent" -- From barrio to mainstream : on the politics of latino/a art museums -- The "disciplining" of ethnic studies : or, why it will take Goya foods and J. Lo to endow Latino studies -- Conclusion: On the dangers of wishful thinking.
Summary: "Illegal immigrant, tax burden, job stealer. Patriot, family oriented, hard worker, model consumer. Ever since Latinos became the largest minority in the U.S. they have been caught between these wildly contrasting characterizations leaving us to wonder: Are Latinos friend or foe? Latino Spin cuts through the spin about Latinos' supposed values, political attitudes, and impact on U.S. national identity to ask what these caricatures suggest about Latinos' shifting place in the popular and political imaginary. Noted scholar Arlene Dávila illustrates the growing consensus among pundits, advocates, and scholars that Latinos are not a social liability, that they are moving up and contributing, and that, in fact, they are more American than "the Americans." But what is at stake in such a sanitized and marketable representation of Latinidad? Dávila follows the spin through the realm of politics, think tanks, Latino museums, and urban planning to uncover whether they effectively challenge the growing fear over Latinos' supposedly dreadful effect on the "integrity" of U.S. national identity. What may be some of the intended or unintended consequences of these more marketable representations in regard to current debates over immigration? With particular attention to what these representations reveal about the place and role of Latinos in the contemporary politics of race, Latino Spin highlights the realities they skew and the polarization they effect between Latinos and other minorities, and among Latinos themselves along the lines of citizenship and class. Finally, by considering Latinos in all their diversity, including their increasing financial and geographic disparities, Dávila can present alternative and more empowering representations of Latinidad to help attain true political equity and intraracial coalitions."--Publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E184 .S75 D3553 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001970664

Includes bibliographical references (pages 181-196) and index.

Here comes the Latino middle class -- Latinos : "the new Republicans (they just don't know it)" -- The Hispanic consumer: that's "a lot of dollars, cars, diapers, and food" -- The Times-Squaring of el barrio : on mega-projects, spin, and "community consent" -- From barrio to mainstream : on the politics of latino/a art museums -- The "disciplining" of ethnic studies : or, why it will take Goya foods and J. Lo to endow Latino studies -- Conclusion: On the dangers of wishful thinking.

"Illegal immigrant, tax burden, job stealer. Patriot, family oriented, hard worker, model consumer. Ever since Latinos became the largest minority in the U.S. they have been caught between these wildly contrasting characterizations leaving us to wonder: Are Latinos friend or foe? Latino Spin cuts through the spin about Latinos' supposed values, political attitudes, and impact on U.S. national identity to ask what these caricatures suggest about Latinos' shifting place in the popular and political imaginary. Noted scholar Arlene Dávila illustrates the growing consensus among pundits, advocates, and scholars that Latinos are not a social liability, that they are moving up and contributing, and that, in fact, they are more American than "the Americans." But what is at stake in such a sanitized and marketable representation of Latinidad? Dávila follows the spin through the realm of politics, think tanks, Latino museums, and urban planning to uncover whether they effectively challenge the growing fear over Latinos' supposedly dreadful effect on the "integrity" of U.S. national identity. What may be some of the intended or unintended consequences of these more marketable representations in regard to current debates over immigration? With particular attention to what these representations reveal about the place and role of Latinos in the contemporary politics of race, Latino Spin highlights the realities they skew and the polarization they effect between Latinos and other minorities, and among Latinos themselves along the lines of citizenship and class. Finally, by considering Latinos in all their diversity, including their increasing financial and geographic disparities, Dávila can present alternative and more empowering representations of Latinidad to help attain true political equity and intraracial coalitions."--Publisher's description.

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