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Captives and voyagers : black migrants across the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world / Alexander X. Byrd.

By: Byrd, Alexander X, 1968-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Antislavery, abolition, and the Atlantic world: Publisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c2008Description: xi, 346 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780807133590 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807133590 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Slavery -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Blacks -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Slave trade -- Nigeria -- History -- 18th century | Sierra Leone -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Captives and voyagers.DDC classification: 306.3/62094109033
Contents:
The slave trade from the Biafran interior : violence, serial displacement, and the rudiments of Igbo society -- The slave ship and the beginnings of Igbo society in the African diaspora -- White power and the context of slave seasoning in eighteenth-century Jamaica -- Routines of disaster and revolution -- Social movement and imagining freedom in the British capital -- Migration and the impossible demands of leaving London -- From slaves to free subjects in British North America -- Black society and the limits of British freedom -- The effects of exodus : Afro-maritime society in motion -- Arriving in Sierra Leone : catastrophe and its aftermaths -- Conclusion: Migration and black society in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world.
Awards: American Historical Association Wesley-Logan Prize in African diaspora history, 2009.Review: "Captives and Voyagers breaks away from the conventional image of transatlantic migration and illustrates how black men and women, enslaved and free, came to populate the edges of an Anglo-Atlantic world. Whether as settlers in Sierra Leone or as slaves in Jamaica, these migrants brought a deep and affecting experience of being in motion to their new homelands. As they became firmly ensconced in the particulars of their new local circumstances, they both shaped and were themselves molded by the demands of the British Atlantic world." "Byrd focuses on the two largest and most significant streams of black dislocation: the forced immigration of Africans from the Biafran interior of present-day southeastern Nigeria to Jamaica as part of the British slave trade and the emigration of free blacks from Great Britain and British North America to Sierra Leone in West Africa. Paying particular attention to the social and cultural effects of transatlantic migration on the groups themselves and focusing as well on their place in the British Empire, Byrd illuminates the meaning and experience of slavery and liberty for people whose journeys were similarly beset by extreme violence and catastrophe."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HT1161 .B97 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001974930

Includes bibliographical references (p. [313]-332) and index.

The slave trade from the Biafran interior : violence, serial displacement, and the rudiments of Igbo society -- The slave ship and the beginnings of Igbo society in the African diaspora -- White power and the context of slave seasoning in eighteenth-century Jamaica -- Routines of disaster and revolution -- Social movement and imagining freedom in the British capital -- Migration and the impossible demands of leaving London -- From slaves to free subjects in British North America -- Black society and the limits of British freedom -- The effects of exodus : Afro-maritime society in motion -- Arriving in Sierra Leone : catastrophe and its aftermaths -- Conclusion: Migration and black society in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world.

"Captives and Voyagers breaks away from the conventional image of transatlantic migration and illustrates how black men and women, enslaved and free, came to populate the edges of an Anglo-Atlantic world. Whether as settlers in Sierra Leone or as slaves in Jamaica, these migrants brought a deep and affecting experience of being in motion to their new homelands. As they became firmly ensconced in the particulars of their new local circumstances, they both shaped and were themselves molded by the demands of the British Atlantic world." "Byrd focuses on the two largest and most significant streams of black dislocation: the forced immigration of Africans from the Biafran interior of present-day southeastern Nigeria to Jamaica as part of the British slave trade and the emigration of free blacks from Great Britain and British North America to Sierra Leone in West Africa. Paying particular attention to the social and cultural effects of transatlantic migration on the groups themselves and focusing as well on their place in the British Empire, Byrd illuminates the meaning and experience of slavery and liberty for people whose journeys were similarly beset by extreme violence and catastrophe."--Jacket.

American Historical Association Wesley-Logan Prize in African diaspora history, 2009.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Byrd (Rice Univ.) argues that the nature and circumstances of the voyages of Africans in the Atlantic world (free and slave) shaped the evolution of African American culture. The historiographical significance of Byrd's study lies in the voyages he examines, including an effort of former African American British colonists in New York to establish new communities in Nova Scotia, and a failed effort of poor black Londoners to establish a free colony in Sierra Leone. The author notes that "over the last generation the historiography has come to downplay the transformative social significance of transatlantic migration." By teasing out details from a vast array of limited sources, especially regarding the Nova Scotia and Sierra Leone expeditions, the author reveals the expectations and brutal reality that both slaves and free blacks faced in the Atlantic world at the height of the transatlantic slave trade. Byrd's work reveals that free blacks seeking to establish communities that might provide them more opportunities faced numerous obstacles in an Atlantic world politically, economically, and socially identified with racism and chattel slavery. Crisply written, superbly researched, and avoiding overly pedantic theoretical models and jargon, Byrd's work is a wonderful contribution to Atlantic world scholarship. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. L. Stacey Louisiana State University at Alexandria

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Alexander X. Byrd is an assistant professor of history at Rice University, where he teaches African American history and the history of the African Diaspora.</p>

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