Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The Harriet Jacobs family papers / Jean Fagan Yellin, editor ; Joseph M. Thomas, executive editor ; Kate Culkin, associate editor ; Scott Korb, associate editor.

By: Jacobs, Harriet A. (Harriet Ann), 1813-1897.
Contributor(s): Jacobs, John S, 1815-1875 | Jacobs, Louisa Matilda, 1833-1917 | Yellin, Jean Fagan.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2008Description: 2 v. (lxxxi, 929 p.) : ill., maps ; 25 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.).ISBN: 9780807831311 (cloth : alk. paper); 080783131X (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Jacobs, Harriet A. (Harriet Ann), 1813-1897 -- Correspondence | Jacobs, John S., 1815-1875 -- Correspondence | Jacobs, Louisa Matilda, 1833-1917 -- Correspondence | Women social reformers -- United States -- Correspondence | Social reformers -- United States -- Correspondence | Slavery -- United States -- History -- 19th century -- Sources | Slaves -- Emancipation -- United States -- Sources | African Americans -- Social conditions -- 19th century -- Sources | United States -- Social conditions -- 19th century -- Sources | Social movements -- United States -- History -- 19th century -- SourcesDDC classification: 306.3/62092
Contents:
pt. 1. September 1810-November 1843: Slavery and Resistance -- pt. 2. September 1845-April 1849: British Respite, Northern Activism -- pt. 3. April 1849-December 1852: Friendship, Fear, Freedom -- pt. 4. January 1853-May 1858: Writing a Life -- June 1858-January 1861: The Slave's Own Story -- pt. 6. January 1861-March 1862: Winning Hearts and Minds -- pt. 7. August 1862-October 1863: Alexandria: The Heart of the Struggle -- pt. 8. October 1863-April 1865: Alexandria: Building Freedom -- pt. 9. April 1865-September 1866: Savannah and the Fight for Reconstruction -- pt. 10. November 1866-August 1868: A New Cause and an Old Commitment -- November 1868-April 1887: From Public to Private -- pt. 12. August 1888-June 1917: Endings.
Summary: Harriet Jacob's life exemplifies the history of her people throughout the nineteenth century. The Harriet Jacobs Family Papers, composed of writings by Jacobs, her brother John S. Jacobs, and her daughter Louisa Matilda Jacobs, writings to them, and private and public writings about them, presents a unique angle of vision. Fueled by the conflict between the impluse of liberty inspiring American life and the institution of chattel slavery blighting that life, the papers collected here off new perspectives on nineteenth-century struggles against slavery, racism, and sexism. The Harriet Jacobs Family Papers is designed as a lasting contribution to the ongoing study of the ways in which these national struggles and the social conditions that gave rise to them have shaped our culture and continue to shape our lives.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E444 .J17 A4 2008 V.1 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001975127
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E444 .J17 A4 2008 V.2 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001975135

accompanying CD-ROM (electronic resource) Harriet Jacobs family papers: volumes 1 & 2

LC copy 2, vol. 1 imperfect: CD-ROM wanting. DLC

Includes bibliographical references and index.

pt. 1. September 1810-November 1843: Slavery and Resistance -- pt. 2. September 1845-April 1849: British Respite, Northern Activism -- pt. 3. April 1849-December 1852: Friendship, Fear, Freedom -- pt. 4. January 1853-May 1858: Writing a Life -- June 1858-January 1861: The Slave's Own Story -- pt. 6. January 1861-March 1862: Winning Hearts and Minds -- pt. 7. August 1862-October 1863: Alexandria: The Heart of the Struggle -- pt. 8. October 1863-April 1865: Alexandria: Building Freedom -- pt. 9. April 1865-September 1866: Savannah and the Fight for Reconstruction -- pt. 10. November 1866-August 1868: A New Cause and an Old Commitment -- November 1868-April 1887: From Public to Private -- pt. 12. August 1888-June 1917: Endings.

Harriet Jacob's life exemplifies the history of her people throughout the nineteenth century. The Harriet Jacobs Family Papers, composed of writings by Jacobs, her brother John S. Jacobs, and her daughter Louisa Matilda Jacobs, writings to them, and private and public writings about them, presents a unique angle of vision. Fueled by the conflict between the impluse of liberty inspiring American life and the institution of chattel slavery blighting that life, the papers collected here off new perspectives on nineteenth-century struggles against slavery, racism, and sexism. The Harriet Jacobs Family Papers is designed as a lasting contribution to the ongoing study of the ways in which these national struggles and the social conditions that gave rise to them have shaped our culture and continue to shape our lives.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This masterwork stems from Pace University English professor emerita Yellin's more than 25 years of research and writing on Harriet Jacobs (1813-97), including her 2002 biography but beginning with her 1987 annotated edition of Jacobs's 1861 autobiographical Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself. Pathbreaking in both U.S. history and American literature, Incidents shunned the pattern of black men's ex-slave narratives and white women's fanciful fiction. It posted an authentic black woman's tale of slavery, sexual assault, and resistance. Jacobs repeatedly thwarted her slaveholder's advances and, rather than succumb, ultimately hid for seven years in her grandmother's cramped North Carolina attic crawl space, separated from her two children whom she could see and hear but not touch or let know she was there. With her coeditors, Yellin now provides more than 900 documents from four generations, moving from Jacobs's grandmother Molly, to her mother, Delilah, to herself and her children, Joseph and Louisa Matilda, ranging from September 1810 to April 1917. The documents are chronologically clustered in two volumes, each with six parts. Brief essays introduce each part, providing historical context and an overview of the Jacobses' lives during the time covered. Headnotes also provide context on the creation, publication, or location of documents and sometimes summarize material not yet published. The opening chronology and brief biographies of persons referenced in the documents are themselves gems. This model of documentary collecting and editing is required for every library serious about its collections on U.S. history, literature, blacks, women, or slavery.--Thomas J. Davis, Arizona State Univ., Tempe (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Yellin's 2004 biography of a self-emancipated slave and lifelong reformer, Harriet Jacobs (CH, Nov'04, 42-1792), demonstrated how a woman, ignored by most during her lifetime due to her race, class, and gender, could yet be brought to life and reveal fascinating details of both her exploitation and her resistance to it. A decades-long search for documents written by and mentioning Jacobs and her immediate family made the biography possible, and now Yellin (emer., English, Pace Univ.) shares over 300 of these in this two-volume collection. The documents reveal important clues not only about the Jacobs clan itself, but also about their interactions with others, both black and white, sympathetic to their cause and not. Everything a reader could wish for is here: maps, photographs, chronology, family tree, biographies of the main correspondents, lists of related but excluded materials, and extensive notes and introductions to documents that frequently are longer than the documents themselves. While optimistically projecting an audience from kindergarten on up, these volumes will be of greatest interest to graduate students and scholars and those seriously committed to African American and women's history. Summing Up: Essential. Graduate students/faculty. P. F. Field emerita, Ohio University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Born into slavery in North Carolina, Jacobs's early life was one of abuse and hardship. At the age of 21, she was sent to work on a plantation as penalty for having rejected the sexual advances of her white owner, whereupon she determined to free herself and her children at whatever cost. In 1842 Jacobs escaped to the North and was placed in the home of the popular New York writer, N. P. Willis. Several years later she moved to Rochester, New York, where she became active in a group of antislavery feminists. It was at their urging that she first came to think of writing her autobiography, since slave narratives were found to be an effective means of turning northern sentiment against the cruelties of slavery. <p> Jacobs worked on her book during the next several years, finally finishing it in 1858, but no publisher was willing to publish it. Only after Lydia Maria Child, a leading white abolitionist, agreed to write a preface to Jacobs's autobiography was the book able to find its way into print in 1861. Coming as it did, however, so close to the beginning of the Civil War, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (published under the pseudonym "Linda Brent") did not win the enormous popularity that other slave narratives had previously enjoyed, such as Frederick Douglass's Narrative (1845). Nor was its popularity increased by its frank depiction of the sexual exploitation of female slaves by their masters. However, white women reader were especially moved by the account of a woman who had fought so heroically to free herself and her children from slavery, even at the cost of her "virtue," and were able to identify with her through the perspective of their own situations as wives and mothers. During and after the Civil War, Jacobs traveled and spoke on behalf of the rights of African Americans, her effectiveness enhanced by the recognition that she had earned as an author. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.