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Impossible subjects : illegal aliens and the making of modern America / Mae M. Ngai.

By: Ngai, Mae M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Politics and society in twentieth-century America: Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2004Description: xx, 377 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0691074712 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780691074719 (cloth : alk. paper); 0691124299 (pbk.); 9780691124292 (pbk.).Subject(s): Illegal aliens -- United States -- History | Emigration and immigration law -- United States -- History | Citizenship -- United States -- HistoryDDC classification: 342.73/083 LOC classification: JV6483 | .N49 2004Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
List of figures and illustrations -- List of tables -- Acknowledgments -- Note on language and terminology -- Introduction : Illegal aliens : a problem of law and history -- The regime of quotas and papers -- The Johnson-Reed Act of 1924 and the reconstruction of race in immigration law -- Deportation policy and the making and unmaking of illegal aliens -- Migrants at the margins of law and nation -- From Colonial subject to undesirable alien : Filipino migration in the invisible empire -- Braceros, "wetbacks," and the national boundaries of class -- War, nationalism, and alien citizenship -- The World War II internment of Japanese Americans and the citizenship renunciation cases -- The Cold War Chinese immigration crisis and the confession cases -- Pluralism and nationalism in post-World War II immigration reform -- The liberal critique and reform of immigration policy -- Epilogue -- Appendix -- Notes -- Archival and other primary sources -- Index.
Review: "This book traces the origins of the "illegal alien" in American law and society, explaining why and how illegal migration became the central problem in U.S. immigration policy - a process that profoundly shaped ideas and practices about citizenship, race, and state authority in the twentieth century."--Jacket.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JV6483 .N49 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001975515

Includes bibliographical references (p. [357]-368) and index.

List of figures and illustrations -- List of tables -- Acknowledgments -- Note on language and terminology -- Introduction : Illegal aliens : a problem of law and history -- pt. 1. The regime of quotas and papers -- 1. The Johnson-Reed Act of 1924 and the reconstruction of race in immigration law -- 2. Deportation policy and the making and unmaking of illegal aliens -- pt. 2. Migrants at the margins of law and nation -- 3. From Colonial subject to undesirable alien : Filipino migration in the invisible empire -- 4. Braceros, "wetbacks," and the national boundaries of class -- pt. 3. War, nationalism, and alien citizenship -- 5. The World War II internment of Japanese Americans and the citizenship renunciation cases -- 6. The Cold War Chinese immigration crisis and the confession cases -- pt. 4. Pluralism and nationalism in post-World War II immigration reform -- 7. The liberal critique and reform of immigration policy -- Epilogue -- Appendix -- Notes -- Archival and other primary sources -- Index.

"This book traces the origins of the "illegal alien" in American law and society, explaining why and how illegal migration became the central problem in U.S. immigration policy - a process that profoundly shaped ideas and practices about citizenship, race, and state authority in the twentieth century."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This study examines how our "nation of immigrants" constructed the entity of the "illegal alien" out of a mixture of racism, nationalism, and corporate greed. Expertly blending documentary sources, interviews, the press, and published analyses, Ngai (Univ. of Chicago) exposes the problems created by the sixty-year (1924-65) longevity of the immigration policies of the Johnson-Reed Act of 1924. She also shows how post-9/11 attitudes toward Muslims carry on this tendency. From the 1885 policies to prevent Chinese (and later Japanese) immigration, to the addition of quotas based on national origins in Johnson-Reed, US immigration policy increasingly moved toward exclusion and even expulsion. In 1952, Communists and other political radicals were added to the list until 1965, when the Hart-Celler Act liberalized racial and national restrictions, retaining numerical limits. The large numbers of immigrants who either remained in the country or entered it without authorization were thus illegal. Ngai pulls no punches, arguing that in most cases these illegal people were stigmatized by negative racial stereotypes and branded as dangerous. This work complements and expands Roger Daniels's Guarding the Golden Door (CH, Oct'04). ^BSumming Up: Essential. Best suited for upper-division students and above, it belongs in every library and should be referenced in every ethnic studies course. E. L. Turk emerita, Indiana University East

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mae Ngai is Associate Professor of U.S. History at the University of Chicago.

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