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Shadows at dawn : a borderlands massacre and the violence of history / Karl Jacoby.

By: Jacoby, Karl, 1965-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Penguin history of American life: Publisher: New York : Penguin Press, 2008Description: xix, 358 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781594201936; 1594201935.Subject(s): Camp Grant Massacre, Ariz., 1871 | Apache Indians -- Wars | Apache Indians -- History -- 19th century | Massacres -- Arizona -- Aravaipa Canyon | Indians of North America -- Crimes against -- Arizona -- Aravaipa Canyon | Indians, Treatment of -- Arizona -- Aravaipa Canyon | Aravaipa Canyon (Ariz.) -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Shadows at dawn.DDC classification: 973.8/2
Contents:
pt. 1. Violence. -- The O'odham -- Los Vecinos -- The Americans -- The Nn̲ēē -- pt. 2. Justice. -- pt. 3. Memory. -- The O'odham -- Los Vecinos -- The Americans -- The Nn̲ēē.
Summary: Predawn, April 30, 1871, a party of Americans, Mexicans, and Tohono O'odham Indians gathered outside an Apache camp in the Arizona borderlands. At first light they struck, murdering nearly 150 Apaches, mostly women and children, in their sleep. In its day, the atrocity, known as the Camp Grant Massacre, generated unparalleled national attention--federal investigations, heated debate in the press, and a tense criminal trial. This was the era of the United States' "peace policy" toward Indians, and the Apaches had been living on a would-be reservation, under the supposed protection of the U.S. Army. President Grant decried the act as "purely murder," but American settlers countered that the distant U.S. government had failed to protect them from Apache attacks. The massacre has since largely faded from memory. Now, drawing on oral histories, newspaper reports, and participants' accounts, author Karl Jacoby brings this horrific incident and tumultuous era to life.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E83.866 .J33 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001975085
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
E83.866 .A43 Cavalry wife : E83.866 .B82 1971 Indian fights and fighters / E83.866 .D86 1982 Wolves for the blue soldiers : E83.866 .J33 2008 Shadows at dawn : E83.866 .L4 The military conquest of the southern plains / E83.866 .S49 H87 1999 Phil Sheridan and his army / E83.866 .U87 Frontier regulars;

Includes bibliographical references (p. [323]-344) and index.

pt. 1. Violence. -- The O'odham -- Los Vecinos -- The Americans -- The Nn̲ēē -- pt. 2. Justice. -- pt. 3. Memory. -- The O'odham -- Los Vecinos -- The Americans -- The Nn̲ēē.

Predawn, April 30, 1871, a party of Americans, Mexicans, and Tohono O'odham Indians gathered outside an Apache camp in the Arizona borderlands. At first light they struck, murdering nearly 150 Apaches, mostly women and children, in their sleep. In its day, the atrocity, known as the Camp Grant Massacre, generated unparalleled national attention--federal investigations, heated debate in the press, and a tense criminal trial. This was the era of the United States' "peace policy" toward Indians, and the Apaches had been living on a would-be reservation, under the supposed protection of the U.S. Army. President Grant decried the act as "purely murder," but American settlers countered that the distant U.S. government had failed to protect them from Apache attacks. The massacre has since largely faded from memory. Now, drawing on oral histories, newspaper reports, and participants' accounts, author Karl Jacoby brings this horrific incident and tumultuous era to life.--From publisher description.

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Library Journal Review

On April 30, 1871, a group made up of Arizona civilians, Tohono O'odham, and Mexicans slaughtered approximately 150 sleeping Apache, most of whom were women and children. Through this atrocity, dubbed the Camp Grant Massacre, Jacoby (history, Brown Univ.; Crimes Against Nature: Squatters, Poachers, Thieves, and the Hidden History of American Conservation) explores the role of violence in shaping the settlement of the southwestern portion of the present-day United States. He traces the history of the four groups involved in the massacre to show how both real and perceived grievances against the Apache led such ethnically and culturally diverse peoples as Americans, Mexicans, and Tohono O'odham to set aside their differences and turn to unmitigated barbarity. This deftly constructed historical work demonstrates that what appears to have been a minor event can in fact illuminate important historical truths that should not be forgotten. Jacoby's superbly researched monograph is highly recommended for public and academic libraries.--John Burch, Campbellsville Univ. Lib., KY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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