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What comes naturally : miscegenation law and the making of race in America / Peggy Pascoe.

By: Pascoe, Peggy.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford, England ; New York, NY : Oxford University Press, 2009Description: 404 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780195094633 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0195094638 (hardcover : alk. paper).Other title: Miscegenation law and the making of race in America.Subject(s): Racially mixed people -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States -- History | Miscegenation -- United States -- History | Interracial marriage -- United States -- HistoryDDC classification: 346.73/01/6
Contents:
Maps -- Introduction -- Part I: Miscegenation law and constitutional equality, 1863-1900 -- 1: Engendering miscegenation -- 2: Sexualizing miscegenation law -- Part 2: Miscegenation law and race classification, 1860-1948 -- 3: Configuring race in the American West -- 4: Facts of race in the courtroom -- 5: Seeing like a racial state -- Part 3: Miscegenation law and its opponents, 1913-1967 -- 6: Between a rock and a hard place -- 7: Interracial marriage as a natural right -- 8: Interracial marriage as a civil right -- Part 4: Politics of colorblindness, 1967-2000 -- 9: Lionizing loving -- Conclusion: Ghost of the past -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- Index.
Summary: Synopsis: A long-awaited history that promises to dramatically change our understanding of race in America, What Comes Naturally traces the origins, spread, and demise of miscegenation laws in the United States-laws that banned interracial marriage and sex, and which were enacted and applied not just in the South but throughout most of the country, in the West, the North, and the Midwest. Beginning in the Reconstruction era, when the term miscegenation first was coined, Peggy Pascoe traces the creation of a racial hierarchy that bolstered white supremacy and banned the marriage of Whites to Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, and American Indians, as well as the marriage of Whites to Blacks. She takes readers into the lost world of miscegenation law, showing how legislators, lawyers, and judges used ideas about gender and sexuality to enact and enforce miscegenation laws. Judges labeled interracial marriages "unnatural," marriage license clerks made them seem statistically invisible, and newspaper reporters turned them into sensational morality tales. Taken together, their actions embedded a multiracial version of white supremacy deep in the heart of the modern American state. Pascoe ends not simply with the landmark 1967 case of Loving v. Virginia, in which the U.S. Supreme Court finally struck down miscegenation laws, but with a look at the implications of the ideal of colorblindness that replaced them. Moving effortlessly from the lives of interracial couples, the politicking of the NAACP, and the outraged objections of Filipino immigrants to the halls of state legislatures and rulings of the Supreme Court, What Comes Naturally transcends older interpretations of bans on interracial marriage as a southern story in black and white to offer a stunning account of the national scope and multiracial breadth of America's tragic history of miscegenation laws.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
KF4755 .P37 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001975150
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
KF4755 .B76 2007 Race, law, and American society : KF4755 .D45 1998 Race, place, and the law, 1836-1948 / KF4755 .G76 2008 What blood won't tell : KF4755 .P37 2009 What comes naturally : KF4757.A5 F7 1975 Southern justice / KF4757 .C48 2009 Changes in law and society during the Civil War and Reconstruction : KF4757 .F56 2010 Race and the Constitution :

Includes bibliographical references (p. [323]-389) and index.

Maps -- Introduction -- Part I: Miscegenation law and constitutional equality, 1863-1900 -- 1: Engendering miscegenation -- 2: Sexualizing miscegenation law -- Part 2: Miscegenation law and race classification, 1860-1948 -- 3: Configuring race in the American West -- 4: Facts of race in the courtroom -- 5: Seeing like a racial state -- Part 3: Miscegenation law and its opponents, 1913-1967 -- 6: Between a rock and a hard place -- 7: Interracial marriage as a natural right -- 8: Interracial marriage as a civil right -- Part 4: Politics of colorblindness, 1967-2000 -- 9: Lionizing loving -- Conclusion: Ghost of the past -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- Index.

Synopsis: A long-awaited history that promises to dramatically change our understanding of race in America, What Comes Naturally traces the origins, spread, and demise of miscegenation laws in the United States-laws that banned interracial marriage and sex, and which were enacted and applied not just in the South but throughout most of the country, in the West, the North, and the Midwest. Beginning in the Reconstruction era, when the term miscegenation first was coined, Peggy Pascoe traces the creation of a racial hierarchy that bolstered white supremacy and banned the marriage of Whites to Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, and American Indians, as well as the marriage of Whites to Blacks. She takes readers into the lost world of miscegenation law, showing how legislators, lawyers, and judges used ideas about gender and sexuality to enact and enforce miscegenation laws. Judges labeled interracial marriages "unnatural," marriage license clerks made them seem statistically invisible, and newspaper reporters turned them into sensational morality tales. Taken together, their actions embedded a multiracial version of white supremacy deep in the heart of the modern American state. Pascoe ends not simply with the landmark 1967 case of Loving v. Virginia, in which the U.S. Supreme Court finally struck down miscegenation laws, but with a look at the implications of the ideal of colorblindness that replaced them. Moving effortlessly from the lives of interracial couples, the politicking of the NAACP, and the outraged objections of Filipino immigrants to the halls of state legislatures and rulings of the Supreme Court, What Comes Naturally transcends older interpretations of bans on interracial marriage as a southern story in black and white to offer a stunning account of the national scope and multiracial breadth of America's tragic history of miscegenation laws.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Pascoe (history and ethnic studies, Univ. of Oregon) has compiled a comprehensive history of laws banning interracial marriage in the US. She tracks the emergence of miscegenation laws in the 1860s up through the US Supreme Court's 1967 declaration in Loving v. Virginia that bans on interracial marriage violate the Constitution. Along the way Pascoe details the multiple versions of miscegenation laws, which variously barred whites from marrying blacks, from marrying Asians, and from marrying Native Americans. The key common thread was a ban on marriages between whites and nonwhites; miscegenation, as Pascoe shows, was a key component of white supremacy, which its followers used as a device for preserving the purity of the white race. The book concludes with a postmortem on the "color-blind" marriage regime initiated by the Loving decision. Pascoe's research is exhaustive and meticulous. While the sheer volume of detail may overwhelm undergraduates, the book is a well-written history of an important dimension of the civil rights narrative in the US. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. S. B. Lichtman Shippensburg University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<br> Peggy Pascoe is Beekman Professor of Northwest and Pacific History at the University of Oregon.<br>

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