Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Some wild visions : autobiographies by itinerant female preachers in 19th-century America / Elizabeth Elkin Grammer.

By: Grammer, Elizabeth Elkin, 1963-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Religion in America series (Oxford University Press): Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003Description: x, 211 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0195139615 (alk. paper); 9780195139617 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Women evangelists -- United States -- Biography -- History and criticism | Autobiography -- Women authors | Women evangelists -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Autobiography -- Religious aspects -- Christianity -- History -- 19th century | Women and literature -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 277.3/081/0922 | B Other classification: 11.55 Summary: This book is a study of seven autobiographies by women who defied the domestic ideology of nineteenth-century America by serving as itinerant preachers. Literally and culturally homeless, all of them used their autobiographies to construct, from an array of materials, plausible identities as women and Christians in an age that found them hard to understand.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BV3780 .G73 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001979889

Includes bibliographical references (p. 171-194) and index.

This book is a study of seven autobiographies by women who defied the domestic ideology of nineteenth-century America by serving as itinerant preachers. Literally and culturally homeless, all of them used their autobiographies to construct, from an array of materials, plausible identities as women and Christians in an age that found them hard to understand.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Grammer (University of the South) examines the autobiographies of seven women evangelists--Jarena Lee, Zilpha Elaw, Nancy Toole, Lydia Sexton, Laura Haviland, Julia Foote, and Amanda Berry Smith--in light of the literary tradition of autobiography and the evangelical and revivalist movement of the 19th century. Grounded in historical context, the study emphasizes the ways these women worked within the evangelical religion to measure the oppression they experienced and overcame. Unlike many female autobiographers, who emphasize domesticity over public life, these writers use the acceptable language of the private sphere to describe their public lives. Rejecting home and domesticity for homelessness and itinerancy, each writer presents self as an active agent in the conversion of others and uses the quantitative language of the marketplace to do so. Unlike Sidonie Smith, who sees women autobiographers as perpetuating women's disempowerment by suggesting their stories make them representative men, Grammer describes empowered lives, thrilled to experience the competition, challenge, and danger of an itinerant. The author pays judicious attention to form, providing analysis that might suggest that as with Virginia Woolf's A Sketch of the Past, the appearance of formlessness in these authors may be an artistic choice in the presentation of self. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above studying literature and religion. N. Allen West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elizabeth Elkin Grammer is at Uiversity of the South.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.