The time bind : when work becomes home and home becomes work / Arlie Russell Hochschild.

By: Hochschild, Arlie Russell, 1940-Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Metropolitan Books, 1997Edition: 1st edDescription: xv, 316 p. : ill. ; 24 cmISBN: 0805044701 (alk. paper); 9780805044706 (alk. paper); 080504471X; 9780805044713Other title: When work becomes home and home becomes workSubject(s): Dual-career families -- United States | Work and family -- United States | Sex role -- United States | Working mothers -- United States | Dual-career families United States | Sex role United States | Work and family United States | Working mothers United StatesDDC classification: 306.3/6 LOC classification: HQ536 | .H633 1997Other classification: 85.52 | MS 2050
Contents:
Pt.1. About time. The waving window -- Managed values and long days -- An angel of an idea -- Family values and reversed worlds -- Pt.2. From executive suite to factory floor. Giving at the office -- The administrative mother -- "All my friends are worker bees": being a part-time professional -- "I'm still married": work as an escape valve -- "Catching up on the soaps": male pioneers in the culture of time -- What if the boss says no? -- "I want them to grow up to be good single moms" -- The overextended family -- Overtime hounds -- Pt.3. Implications and alternatives. The third shift --Evading the time bind -- Making time.
Summary: In her remarkable new book, The Time Bind, Arlie Hochschild brings us startling news of the ways in which home is being invaded by the time pressures and efficiencies of work, while the workplace is, for many parents, being transformed into a strange kind of surrogate home. For three years at a Fortune 500 company, she interviewed everyone from top executives to factory hands, sat in on business meetings, followed sales teams onto golf courses, and trailed working parents and their children through their days. In a series of vivid portraits, Hochschild paints a surprising picture of couples as time thieves, children as emotional bill-collectors, spouses as efficiency experts, parents who feel like helpful mothers and fathers mainly to their workmates, and women who - like generations of men before them - flee the pressures of home for the relief of work.Summary: Hochschild's groundbreaking study exposes our crunch-time world and reveals how, after the first shift at work and the second at home, comes the third, and hardest, shift of repairing the damage created by the first two.
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HQ536 .H633 1997 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001976000

Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-307) and index.

Pt.1. About time. The waving window -- Managed values and long days -- An angel of an idea -- Family values and reversed worlds -- Pt.2. From executive suite to factory floor. Giving at the office -- The administrative mother -- "All my friends are worker bees": being a part-time professional -- "I'm still married": work as an escape valve -- "Catching up on the soaps": male pioneers in the culture of time -- What if the boss says no? -- "I want them to grow up to be good single moms" -- The overextended family -- Overtime hounds -- Pt.3. Implications and alternatives. The third shift --Evading the time bind -- Making time.

In her remarkable new book, The Time Bind, Arlie Hochschild brings us startling news of the ways in which home is being invaded by the time pressures and efficiencies of work, while the workplace is, for many parents, being transformed into a strange kind of surrogate home. For three years at a Fortune 500 company, she interviewed everyone from top executives to factory hands, sat in on business meetings, followed sales teams onto golf courses, and trailed working parents and their children through their days. In a series of vivid portraits, Hochschild paints a surprising picture of couples as time thieves, children as emotional bill-collectors, spouses as efficiency experts, parents who feel like helpful mothers and fathers mainly to their workmates, and women who - like generations of men before them - flee the pressures of home for the relief of work.

Hochschild's groundbreaking study exposes our crunch-time world and reveals how, after the first shift at work and the second at home, comes the third, and hardest, shift of repairing the damage created by the first two.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Hochschild, coauthor of the acclaimed The Second Shift (LJ 4/15/89), here reports on a study she conducted of a large company (name changed) to see why employees were not taking advantage of the "family friendly" options it offered. She found that employees were the "working scared"; despite options, management had conveyed the sense that employee devotion to the company was based on the number of hours at work. The hourly production workers who did not have access to the family benefits still opted for overtime and double shifts. They wanted to keep their jobs secure, although in the end, the employer laid off half the employees through downsizing. The author also contends that for many employees work was more rewarding than home life and a pleasant escape for parents, and they did not want to give it up. Hochschild gives some attention to the plight of the workers' children, but she could have gone into greater depth. Still, this is valuable study. Recommended for business collections.‘Peggy Odom, Texas Lib. Assn., Waco (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Hochschild offers an abundance of data and insight into the modernization of warfare between family and work. Her study of the persons and policies of "Amerco," a pseudonymous but representative corporate environment, shows how, at all occupational levels within the firm, workers have been persuaded not only to accept, but to actively value, the culture of long work hours. Modern participatory management techniques (especially the Total Quality Movement) have created a workplace that is not just a setting for generating income but also a source of emotional rewards, interpersonal support, personal growth, empowerment, and recognition. Americans are in a "time bind," with personal relationships and family life pared down, outsourced, regulated, commercialized, and commodified to create enough hours in the day for work. Hochschild offers the provocative conclusion that a better work-family balance begins with the recognition that men and women are simultaneously "prisoners and architects" of a work structure that erodes family, leisure, and civic life. An important book for readers and students at all levels. M. R. Fowlkes; University of Connecticut

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Arlie Russell Hochschild, a professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, is the author of two New York Times Notable Books of the Year, THE SECOND SHIFT and THE MANAGED HEART. She has received numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a research grant from the National Institute of Mental Health. Her articles have appeared in Harper's, Mother Jones, and Psychology Today, among others. She lives in San Francisco with her husband, the writer Adam Hochschild.

(Publisher Provided) Arlie Russell Hochschild, Hochschild was a Professor of Sociology and directed the Center for Working Families at the University of California, Berkeley. She married writer Adam Hochschild, and they had two sons. She has been a Lang Visiting Professor of Social Change at Swarthmore College and a Fulbright Scholar at the Center for Development Studies in Trivandrum, Kerala, India.

She has written articles that have appeared in scholarly journals as well as Harper's, Mother Jones, and The New York Times Magazine. She has received awards from the Fulbright, Guggenheim and Alfred P. Sloan foundations and from the National Institute of Public Health.

Hochschild is the author of "The Second Shift," The Managed Heart," and "The Time Bind." She believed that women moving into the workforce have not been accompanied by changes in the workplace, and the issues of daycare and the role of men at home have caused tension within the family.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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