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A matter of justice : Eisenhower and the beginning of the civil rights revolution / David A. Nichols.

By: Nichols, David A. (David Allen), 1939-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, 2008Edition: 1st Simon & Schuster trade pbk. ed.Description: 353 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781416541516; 1416541519.Subject(s): Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969 -- Political and social views | Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969 -- Relations with African Americans | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights -- United States -- History -- 20th century | School integration -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Race relations -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Politics and government -- 1953-1961 | Presidents -- United States -- BiographyDDC classification: 973.921092 22
Contents:
The candidate -- Invoking federal authority -- The president and Brown -- A judiciary to enforce Brown -- The president and the chief justice -- Confronting southern resistance -- The Civil Rights Act of 1957 -- The Little Rock crisis -- Military intervention in Little Rock -- Rising expectations -- The final act -- Leading from Gettysburg -- Conclusion: A matter of justice.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E836 .N53 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001990449

Includes bibliographical references (p. 284-334) and index.

The candidate -- Invoking federal authority -- The president and Brown -- A judiciary to enforce Brown -- The president and the chief justice -- Confronting southern resistance -- The Civil Rights Act of 1957 -- The Little Rock crisis -- Military intervention in Little Rock -- Rising expectations -- The final act -- Leading from Gettysburg -- Conclusion: A matter of justice.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Historians have given Dwight Eisenhower low marks for his civil rights record mostly because he did not use the presidential "bully pulpit" to educate the public about segregation's evils. Nichols (Lincoln and the Indians: Civil War Policy and Politics) offers a convincing differing view, which concludes that Eisenhower made unprecedented and enduring contributions to the civil rights cause that laid the groundwork for the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. These include completing the integration of the armed forces; desegregating Washington, DC; and, most important, appointing Earl Warren as chief justice of the Supreme Court and four other pro-civil rights associate justices. None of these events was accidental, according to Nichols, because Eisenhower believed in economic and social justice for African Americans. However, the author rightly admonishes Eisenhower for his reluctance to speak out against the South's failure to obey the laws of the land and for not recognizing the moral support such speeches could have given African Americans. This impressive revisionist account is strongly recommended for larger public and all academic collections. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/07; see the Q&A with Nichols, p. 72.-Ed.]-Karl Helicher, Upper Merion Twp. Lib., King of Prussia, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Although scholarly estimates of his presidency have risen over the past two decades, Dwight Eisenhower continues to be viewed as lax on blacks' civil rights. In this revisionist study, Nichols argues that Ike has suffered a bad rap. Eisenhower's actions advanced minority rights on various fronts, leading the nation in a "new direction." Nichols highlights the president's agency in desegregating the nation's armed forces and public facilities in the District of Columbia; his appointment of outstanding, pro-civil rights judges to the federal bench, among them Chief Justice Earl Warren; his decisive response to Arkansas governor Orval Faubus's challenge to federal authority in Little Rock in 1957; and his introduction of ambitious civil rights bills in his second term. Over Eisenhower's emphatic objections, several of those bills were watered down before passage by Democratic senators. Nichols notes Ike's conviction that law alone could not assure equal treatment and shows how the president's public statements too often clouded the import of his deeds. That Eisenhower creatively used federal authority to advance black civil rights as "a matter of justice," however, is no longer in dispute, thanks to this impressive book. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. M. J. Birkner Gettysburg College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David A. Nichols, a former professor and academic dean at Southwestern College in Kansas, is also the author of Lincoln and the Indians: Civil War Policy and Politics. He lives in Winfield, Kansas

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