FDR / Jean Edward Smith.

By: Smith, Jean EdwardMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Random House, c2007Description: xx, 858 p. : ill. ; 25 cmISBN: 9781400061211 (acid-free paper); 1400061210Subject(s): Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945 | Presidents -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: FDR.DDC classification: 973.917092 | B LOC classification: E807 | .S58 2007Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Preface -- Heritage -- My son Franklin -- Keeping the name in the family -- Albany -- Awakening -- Anchors aweigh -- War -- Lucy -- campaign of 1920 -- Polio -- Governor -- Albany redux -- Nomination -- Nothing to fear -- One hundred days -- New deal ascendant -- Hubris -- Low tide -- On the brink -- Stab in the back -- Four more years -- Arsenal of democracy -- Day of infamy -- Commander in chief -- D-Day -- Last post -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments -- Index.
Summary: Acclaimed biographer Smith combines contemporary scholarship and a broad range of primary source material to narrate the epic life of the president who, more than any other individual, changed the relationship between the American people and their government. We see how Roosevelt's energy, intellect, and personal magnetism permitted him to master countless challenges. Smith recounts FDR's battles with polio and physical disability, and how they helped forge the resolve to surmount the turmoil of the Great Depression and the wartime threats. FDR's private life is also depicted, with close attention paid to the four women who molded his personality and helped to inform his worldview: His mother; his wife, Eleanor; Lucy Mercer, the great love of his life; and Missy LeHand, his secretary, companion, and confidante. Smith also tackles the failures and miscues of Roosevelt's public career. Smith gives us a clear picture of how this Knickerbocker aristocrat, a man who never had to depend on a paycheck, became the common man's president.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E807 .S58 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001990357
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E807 .R649 V.3 F.D.R. : E807 .R649 V.4 F.D.R. : E807 .S55 2008 FDR and Reagan : E807 .S58 2007 FDR / E811 .D53 Foreign policy and U.S. presidential elections, 1940-1948, E812.9 .J62 Oswald: the truth. E813 .A75 1966 Atomic diplomacy: Hiroshima and Potsdam;

Includes bibliographical references (p. [791]-825) and index.

Preface -- 1. Heritage -- 2. My son Franklin -- 3. Keeping the name in the family -- 4. Albany -- 5. Awakening -- 6. Anchors aweigh -- 7. War -- 8. Lucy -- 9. The campaign of 1920 -- 10. Polio -- 11. Governor -- 12. Albany redux -- 13. Nomination -- 14. Nothing to fear -- 15. One hundred days -- 16. New deal ascendant -- 17. Hubris -- 18. Low tide -- 19. On the brink -- 20. Stab in the back -- 21. Four more years -- 22. Arsenal of democracy -- 23. Day of infamy -- 24. Commander in chief -- 25. D-Day -- 26. Last post -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments -- Index.

Acclaimed biographer Smith combines contemporary scholarship and a broad range of primary source material to narrate the epic life of the president who, more than any other individual, changed the relationship between the American people and their government. We see how Roosevelt's energy, intellect, and personal magnetism permitted him to master countless challenges. Smith recounts FDR's battles with polio and physical disability, and how they helped forge the resolve to surmount the turmoil of the Great Depression and the wartime threats. FDR's private life is also depicted, with close attention paid to the four women who molded his personality and helped to inform his worldview: His mother; his wife, Eleanor; Lucy Mercer, the great love of his life; and Missy LeHand, his secretary, companion, and confidante. Smith also tackles the failures and miscues of Roosevelt's public career. Smith gives us a clear picture of how this Knickerbocker aristocrat, a man who never had to depend on a paycheck, became the common man's president.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Smith (political science, Marshall Univ.; John Marshall: Definer of a Nation ), a constitutional law scholar and the author of several penetrating biographies, including an account of one of our least regarded presidents (Grant), now tackles a President of the highest repute. To understand Franklin D. Roosevelt's legacy requires an appreciation for the unique role that the United States occupies in world history. Understanding America's founding promise and the challenges of the Civil War, the Great Depression, and World War II, Smith unravels the motivation of perhaps the greatest U.S. President-if not the greatest democratic leader-of the 20th century. Smith clearly admires both FDR and his policies. Rather than finding new data, the author excels at placing his narrative in a balanced context. He is especially effective in undermining conspiracy theorists who see Pearl Harbor as a presidential ploy to get the United States into war. As he did so effectively with John Marshall, Smith shows FDR as a human being capable of betrayal, hubris, and stubbornness. This page-turner is the best single-volume biography available of America's 32nd president, complementing the recent work of Doris Kearns Goodwin (No Ordinary Time) and Conrad Black (Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Champion of Freedom). Essential. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 1/07.]-William D. Pederson, Louisiana State Univ., Shreveport (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jean Edward Smith was born on October 13, 1932. He received an A.B. from Princeton University in 1954. He then went on to serve in the military from 1954-1961. In 1964, he obtained his Ph.D. from the Department of Public Law and Government of Columbia University. He is a well known biographer of several works inlcuding those featuring Franklin D. Rooselvelt and Ulysses S. Grant. He is the John Marshall Professor of Political Science at Marshall University and professor emeritus at the University of Toronto.

In 2002 Jean Smith was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography and in 2008 he won the Francis Parkman Prize. His title's inlcude: Bush, Eisenhower in War and Peace, FDR, Grant, and The Face of Justice: Portraits of John Marshall.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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