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The war against regulation : from Jimmy Carter to George W. Bush / Phillip J. Cooper.

By: Cooper, Phillip J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies in government and public policy: Publisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, [2009]Copyright date: ©2009Description: xvi, 288 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780700616817 (cloth : alk. paper); 0700616810 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Trade regulation -- United States | Industrial policy -- United States | Administrative law -- United States | Industrial laws and legislation -- United States | United States -- Politics and government -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: War against regulation.DDC classification: 343.73/08
Contents:
Can there really be an attack on regulation when there is so much of it? The war, the weapons, and modes of attack -- The war against regulation from Jimmy Carter to George H.W. Bush : the commanders in chief and their attacks on regulation -- The William Clinton and George W. Bush administrations : new warriors in the ongoing battle against regulation -- The battle against regulation in courts : the fight against regulation in the burger and rehnquist eras -- "The wrong war in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong enemy" : imagining a different future.
Summary: The author explains how the war against regulation has been conducted both from within and outside the government over the past thirty years. Chronicling its major battles from the Jimmy Carter years through the presidency of George W. Bush, he shows that it is a war-waged by Democrats and Republicans alike-that has been fought in high places but whose casualties include children, senior citizens, the infirm, and millions of families who have lost their homes and retirement savings. Carter, praised for environmental regulation, worked to deregulate airlines, trucking, and banks. Reagan undertook administrative rather than legislative measures against regulation, most of which weren't understood or even known by the public. George H.W. Bush continued the fight with the Quayle Commission. He describes Bill Clinton's commitment to fighting regulation despite having campaigned against his Republican predecessors' policies, and the behind-the-scenes maneuverings of George W. Bush as he sought to gut regulatory agencies entirely. He also devotes an entire chapter to parallel developments in the Supreme Court that substantially advanced the deregulation agenda during this era. The author contends that regulation, as one of a number of policy tools available to our leaders, is neither good nor bad in and of itself. Excessive deregulation, as opposed to regulatory reform, can present considerable peril, as current events clearly show. By considering key issues important to a more effective understanding and use of regulation in the future, this book makes a vital case for restoring debate about regulation's rightful role within the republic and offers hope that a better understanding of that role can help lift us out of our current crisis.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
KF1600 .C66 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001995182

Includes bibliographical references (pages 267-272) and index.

Can there really be an attack on regulation when there is so much of it? The war, the weapons, and modes of attack -- The war against regulation from Jimmy Carter to George H.W. Bush : the commanders in chief and their attacks on regulation -- The William Clinton and George W. Bush administrations : new warriors in the ongoing battle against regulation -- The battle against regulation in courts : the fight against regulation in the burger and rehnquist eras -- "The wrong war in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong enemy" : imagining a different future.

The author explains how the war against regulation has been conducted both from within and outside the government over the past thirty years. Chronicling its major battles from the Jimmy Carter years through the presidency of George W. Bush, he shows that it is a war-waged by Democrats and Republicans alike-that has been fought in high places but whose casualties include children, senior citizens, the infirm, and millions of families who have lost their homes and retirement savings. Carter, praised for environmental regulation, worked to deregulate airlines, trucking, and banks. Reagan undertook administrative rather than legislative measures against regulation, most of which weren't understood or even known by the public. George H.W. Bush continued the fight with the Quayle Commission. He describes Bill Clinton's commitment to fighting regulation despite having campaigned against his Republican predecessors' policies, and the behind-the-scenes maneuverings of George W. Bush as he sought to gut regulatory agencies entirely. He also devotes an entire chapter to parallel developments in the Supreme Court that substantially advanced the deregulation agenda during this era. The author contends that regulation, as one of a number of policy tools available to our leaders, is neither good nor bad in and of itself. Excessive deregulation, as opposed to regulatory reform, can present considerable peril, as current events clearly show. By considering key issues important to a more effective understanding and use of regulation in the future, this book makes a vital case for restoring debate about regulation's rightful role within the republic and offers hope that a better understanding of that role can help lift us out of our current crisis.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Cooper (public administration, Portland State Univ.) describes with dismay the "war against regulation" by the administrations of Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, and both George Bushes. He identifies strategies used to try to eliminate some regulations and enfeeble the implementation of others. He also presents some Supreme Court decisions in the Burger and Rehnquist eras that have antiregulatory implications. Cooper concludes that Americans sadly have come to view regulations as impediments to economic efficiency rather than to understand their true nature as political responses to public problems, such as contaminated food. Unfortunately, the author simply asserts his conclusions rather than letting them emerge from systematic analysis. Weaknesses include the lack of criteria for the selection of examples, the selection of only popular regulations (e.g., rules outlawing carcinogens), and the failure to include efforts to create new rules (e.g., Ronald Reagan's expansion of anti-abortion regulations). Cooper asserts that there are many victims of deregulation yet presents no systematic evaluation of the actual effects of deregulation. He is right that scholars and practitioners need to look skeptically at calls for deregulation, but this anecdotal, descriptive book fails to go beyond raising consciousness. Summing Up: Not recommended. R. E. O'Connor National Science Foundation

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