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My Guantánamo diary : the detainees and the stories they told me / Mahvish Rukhsana Khan.

By: Khan, Mahvish Rukhsana.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Public Affairs, c2008Edition: 1st ed.Description: xv, 302 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781586484989; 1586484982; 9781586487072 (pbk.); 1586487078.Subject(s): War on Terrorism, 2001-2009 | Afghan War, 2001- -- Prisoners and prisons, American | Prisoners of war -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base | Guantánamo Bay Detention Camp | Prisoners of war -- United States | Khan, Mahvish Rukhsana -- DiariesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: My Guantánamo diary.DDC classification: 909.83/1
Contents:
Secret clearance -- The pediatrician -- Getting there -- The old man -- Big bounties -- The goatherd -- The lawyers -- The businessman -- Afghanistan -- Kabul -- Dead detainees -- Habeas hurdles -- Sami Al-Haj -- The drama -- Jumah Al-Dossary -- What the Pentagon said -- The police chief -- The poets -- Serial numbers.
Summary: Mahvish Khan is an American lawyer, born in Michigan to immigrant Afghan parents. Outraged that her country was illegally imprisoning people at Guantánamo, she volunteered to translate for the prisoners. She spoke their language, understood their customs, and brought them Starbucks chai, the closest available drink to the kind of tea they would drink at home. And they quickly befriended her, offering fatherly advice as well as a uniquely personal insight into their plight, and that of their families thousands of miles away. For Khan, the experience was a validation of her Afghan heritage--as well as her American freedoms, which allowed her to intervene at Guantánamo purely out of her sense that it was the right thing to do. Mahvish Khan's story is a challenging, brave test of who she is--and who we are.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV6432 .K493 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001995851

Includes bibliographical references (p. 299-302).

Secret clearance -- The pediatrician -- Getting there -- The old man -- Big bounties -- The goatherd -- The lawyers -- The businessman -- Afghanistan -- Kabul -- Dead detainees -- Habeas hurdles -- Sami Al-Haj -- The drama -- Jumah Al-Dossary -- What the Pentagon said -- The police chief -- The poets -- Serial numbers.

Mahvish Khan is an American lawyer, born in Michigan to immigrant Afghan parents. Outraged that her country was illegally imprisoning people at Guantánamo, she volunteered to translate for the prisoners. She spoke their language, understood their customs, and brought them Starbucks chai, the closest available drink to the kind of tea they would drink at home. And they quickly befriended her, offering fatherly advice as well as a uniquely personal insight into their plight, and that of their families thousands of miles away. For Khan, the experience was a validation of her Afghan heritage--as well as her American freedoms, which allowed her to intervene at Guantánamo purely out of her sense that it was the right thing to do. Mahvish Khan's story is a challenging, brave test of who she is--and who we are.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this highly disturbing and impassioned memoir, Afghan American law school graduate and journalist Mahvish Khan writes of her experiences serving as a translator for lawyers representing detainees at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Khan perceptively details a catalog of horrors and humiliations suffered by the prisoners, including many instances of torture, lack of medical care, and other human rights abuses. She highlights the plight of many so-called enemy combatants who ended up at Guantanamo only because of large bounties paid by U.S . forces for turning over suspected terrorists. With no right to a fair trial and often facing a litany of trumped-up charges, the falsely accused have little recourse; many resort to suicide attempts and hunger strikes in desperation. Khan's blistering expose of the blatant injustices inflicted in the name of fighting terrorism will leave many readers shocked and disillusioned. This is not for the faint of heart. With parallels to Clive Stafford Smith's The Eight O'Clock Ferry to the Windward Side and Murat Kurnaz's Five Years of My Life, this work is highly recommended for all public libraries.--Ingrid Levin, Salve Regina Univ. Lib., Newport, RI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mahvish Khan is a recent law school graduate and journalist. She has been published in the The Wall Street Journal , The New York Times , The Washington Post and other media. She lives in San Diego.

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