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The age of deficits : presidents and unbalanced budgets from Jimmy Carter to George W. Bush / Iwan Morgan.

By: Morgan, Iwan W.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, [2009]Copyright date: ©2009Description: xvi, 375 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780700616855 (cloth : alk. paper); 0700616853 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Budget deficits -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Budget deficits -- United States -- History -- 21st century | Presidents -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Presidents -- United States -- History -- 21st century | Political parties -- United States -- History | Finance, Public -- United States -- History -- 1933- | Fiscal policy -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Fiscal policy -- United States -- History -- 21st century | United States -- Economic policy -- 20th century | United States -- Economic policy -- 2001-2009Additional physical formats: Online version:: Age of deficits.DDC classification: 339.5/23097309045 LOC classification: HJ2051 | .M653 2009
Contents:
Presidents and the other red peril -- Presidents and balanced budgets : a historical perspective -- Jimmy Carter : confronting the deficit -- Ronald Reagan : coexisting with the deficit -- George H.W. Bush : compromising on the deficit -- Bill Clinton : taming the deficit -- George W. Bush : resurrecting the deficit -- Epilogue: Barack Obama : dealing with deficits and debt in the short term and long term -- Appendices: Presidential fiscal profiles.
Summary: This explores the role of presidents in the emergence of large deficits in the period from 1976 through 2008 and shows how they have all, with Bill Clinton's exception, subordinated balanced budgets to the achievements of other parts of their political agenda.
List(s) this item appears in: Political Games Exhibit
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HJ2051 .M653 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001995224

Includes bibliographical references (pages 281-352) and index.

Presidents and the other red peril -- Presidents and balanced budgets : a historical perspective -- Jimmy Carter : confronting the deficit -- Ronald Reagan : coexisting with the deficit -- George H.W. Bush : compromising on the deficit -- Bill Clinton : taming the deficit -- George W. Bush : resurrecting the deficit -- Epilogue: Barack Obama : dealing with deficits and debt in the short term and long term -- Appendices: Presidential fiscal profiles.

This explores the role of presidents in the emergence of large deficits in the period from 1976 through 2008 and shows how they have all, with Bill Clinton's exception, subordinated balanced budgets to the achievements of other parts of their political agenda.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Morgan (Univ. of London) presents a historian's approach to federal government finances, particularly exploding deficits, in the presidencies from Carter onward, an interesting divergence from the process, political incentive, macroeconomic approach normally taken. This work thus focuses on the executive and presidential documents and centers on the peculiar fact that the Democrats have been more successful at deficit control than have the outwardly more fiscally conservative Republicans. While public finance scholars are unlikely to find surprises, Morgan's attention to presidential papers reveals useful insights into some deliberations not usually considered. Unfortunately, technical issues are handled without much professional depth, although some useful budget data for each presidency are provided in an appendix. The exception to the deficit history is a brief period in the Clinton administration, and Morgan does pay attention to the important role that the first Bush administration's Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 played in producing surpluses during that period, a role often given inadequate credit for the brief reversal of the sorry fiscal history. The Obama epilogue focuses on the formidable challenges that he faces in getting national finances back to sustainability, but data are not available for an assessment of his work. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through research and faculty collections. J. L. Mikesell Indiana University--Bloomington

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