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The Protestant temperament : patterns of child-rearing, religious experience, and the self in early America / Philip Greven.

By: Greven, Philip J.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Knopf, 1977Edition: 1st ed.Description: xiv, 431 pages ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0394404238; 9780394404233.Subject(s): Protestantism | Child development | Temperament -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | Experience (Religion) | Religious thought -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Protestant temperament.; Online version:: Protestant temperament.DDC classification: 301.5/8 LOC classification: BR515 | .G75 1977HQ769 | .G74Other classification: 15.85 | BO 5800 | MS 6575
Partial contents:
Part I. Prologue -- A historian's past: patterns of thought and religious belief in early America -- The persistence of piety -- Temperament and the self -- Childhood, temperament, and religious experience.
Part II. The Evangelicals: the self suppressed -- Authoritarian families: modes of evangelical child-rearing -- Pious parents, precious mothers -- The household -- Embryo-angels or infant friends? -- Broken wills: discipline and parental control -- Regular methods of living: external discipline in evangelical households -- Shaping our evangelical conscience: shame, guild, and inner discipline -- The vanities, pleasures, and sins of youth: the emergence of self and self-will -- Themes of evangelical temperament and piety -- Attitudes toward the body -- Broken wills and tender hearts -- Authoritarian temperaments: evangelical responses to power -- Soldiers for Christ: anger, aggression, and enemies -- Brides of Christ: femininity, masculinity, and sexuality -- The quest for purity.
Part III. The moderates: self controlled -- Authoritarian families: moderate modes of child-rearing -- The household setting -- Innocent infants -- Bending the will: moderate discipline and voluntary obedience -- Love and duty: the obligations of connection -- Sober, virtuous and pious people: themes of moderate temperaments and piety -- A sense of connections -- The frailties of human nature -- Self-approbation and self-love -- Self-control and temperate self-denial -- "The liberty of the human will" -- "Habits of piety and virtue" -- The renovation of nature and the growth of grace -- The boundaries of power -- Manliness or effeminacy? -- Unbounded passions: ambition, avarice, and anger -- Diversity and order in church and community.
Part IV. The genteel: the self asserted -- Affectionate families: genteel modes of child-rearing -- "Children much indulged" -- "To curb their children is to spoil their genius" -- From feminine to masculine: the emergence of a young gentlemen -- Educating young gentlemen -- To become "a notable housewife" and "mother" -- Educating young ladies -- The pleasures of genteel youth -- Themes of genteel temperaments and piety -- Unexamined selves: the outward turning of consciousness -- The self indulged -- Contented selves: pleasure and sociability -- Gentle men and gentle women: masculine and feminine -- Sensuality and sexuality -- Acceptable passions: anger, ambition, and pride -- "Religious without feeling": public piety and inner assurance.
Epilogue -- The clash of temperaments: some reflections on the First American Civil War -- An American monarchy or republic? -- Mother country, father-king : perceptions of power and authority -- The nature of liberty -- Effeminate or manly? : seduction, temptation, and political paranoia -- A revolution of saints -- The republic of virtue rejected.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BR515 .G75 1977 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100346303

Includes bibliographical references (pages 404-410) and index.

Part I. Prologue -- A historian's past: patterns of thought and religious belief in early America -- The persistence of piety -- Temperament and the self -- Childhood, temperament, and religious experience.

Part II. The Evangelicals: the self suppressed -- Authoritarian families: modes of evangelical child-rearing -- Pious parents, precious mothers -- The household -- Embryo-angels or infant friends? -- Broken wills: discipline and parental control -- Regular methods of living: external discipline in evangelical households -- Shaping our evangelical conscience: shame, guild, and inner discipline -- The vanities, pleasures, and sins of youth: the emergence of self and self-will -- Themes of evangelical temperament and piety -- Attitudes toward the body -- Broken wills and tender hearts -- Authoritarian temperaments: evangelical responses to power -- Soldiers for Christ: anger, aggression, and enemies -- Brides of Christ: femininity, masculinity, and sexuality -- The quest for purity.

Part III. The moderates: self controlled -- Authoritarian families: moderate modes of child-rearing -- The household setting -- Innocent infants -- Bending the will: moderate discipline and voluntary obedience -- Love and duty: the obligations of connection -- Sober, virtuous and pious people: themes of moderate temperaments and piety -- A sense of connections -- The frailties of human nature -- Self-approbation and self-love -- Self-control and temperate self-denial -- "The liberty of the human will" -- "Habits of piety and virtue" -- The renovation of nature and the growth of grace -- The boundaries of power -- Manliness or effeminacy? -- Unbounded passions: ambition, avarice, and anger -- Diversity and order in church and community.

Part IV. The genteel: the self asserted -- Affectionate families: genteel modes of child-rearing -- "Children much indulged" -- "To curb their children is to spoil their genius" -- From feminine to masculine: the emergence of a young gentlemen -- Educating young gentlemen -- To become "a notable housewife" and "mother" -- Educating young ladies -- The pleasures of genteel youth -- Themes of genteel temperaments and piety -- Unexamined selves: the outward turning of consciousness -- The self indulged -- Contented selves: pleasure and sociability -- Gentle men and gentle women: masculine and feminine -- Sensuality and sexuality -- Acceptable passions: anger, ambition, and pride -- "Religious without feeling": public piety and inner assurance.

Epilogue -- The clash of temperaments: some reflections on the First American Civil War -- An American monarchy or republic? -- Mother country, father-king : perceptions of power and authority -- The nature of liberty -- Effeminate or manly? : seduction, temptation, and political paranoia -- A revolution of saints -- The republic of virtue rejected.

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