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Lying-in : a history of childbirth in America / Richard W. Wertz and Dorothy C. Wertz.

By: Wertz, Richard W.
Contributor(s): Wertz, Dorothy C [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Free Press, [1977]Copyright date: ©1977Description: xii, 260 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0029345103; 9780029345108.Subject(s): Obstetrics -- United States -- History | Childbirth -- United States -- History | Obstetrics -- Social aspects -- United States -- History | Maternal health services -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Lying-in.DDC classification: 618.4
Contents:
Introduction -- Midwives and social childbirth in colonial America -- The new midwifery -- Modesty and morality -- The wounds of birth: birthpain and puerperal fever -- Birth in the hospital -- "Natural childbirth" -- Government involvement -- Epilogue: the search for the best.
Summary: Describes the practice of birth and society's changing attitudes towards the event since Colonial times.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
RG518.U5 W47 1977 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100360304

Includes bibliographical references (pages 249-255) and index.

Introduction -- Midwives and social childbirth in colonial America -- The new midwifery -- Modesty and morality -- The wounds of birth: birthpain and puerperal fever -- Birth in the hospital -- "Natural childbirth" -- Government involvement -- Epilogue: the search for the best.

Describes the practice of birth and society's changing attitudes towards the event since Colonial times.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A welcome republication, with appended concluding chapters, of the first effort to explain childbirth practices in the evolving social and economic dynamics of American life since Colonial times. The authors seek the historical roots of the medicalization of childbirth: its transformation from female ritual, ensconced in home life to a potentially pathogenic event, supervised by physicians in hospitals equipped with state-of-the-art technology. The Wertzes show reciprocal relationships among US cultural values, their impact on social behavior, women's search for safe and expeditious care, and doctors' concerns for good practice and professional advancement. The substance of the original volume (CH, Mar'78) remains unchanged. Provocative new essays carry the theme to the present, when technology intrudes before conception. Women, in their quest for "optimal care" and the "perfect" child, must share responsibility with physicians for the appropriation of childbirth from its natural state. The Wertzes clearly show that high-tech childbirth is in most cased unnecessary, and the efforts to reform childbirth have not only yielded ambiguous results for middle-class advocates of change, but also leave intact a two-class health care system that does not provide essential prenatal care. Good reading for everyone. J. P. Brickman United States Merchant Marine Academy

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