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The good earth / by Pearl S. Buck.

By: Buck, Pearl S. (Pearl Sydenstricker), 1892-1973.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : John Day Co., 1965, c1958Description: 316 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0381980332 :; 9780381980337.Subject(s): China -- Social life and customs -- 1912-1949 -- Fiction | China -- History -- 1928-1937 -- FictionDDC classification: 813.52 Summary: Wang Lang, a simple peasant farmer takes as a wife a battered slave girl who becomes a indomitable, loyal woman. Working the land together they prosper and increase their holdings, yet Wang eventually betrays his family and neglects the earth he had worshipped.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3503.U198 G6 1965 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100417757

"Completely reset ... from the standard edition of 1949."

Wang Lang, a simple peasant farmer takes as a wife a battered slave girl who becomes a indomitable, loyal woman. Working the land together they prosper and increase their holdings, yet Wang eventually betrays his family and neglects the earth he had worshipped.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Nobel Prize winner Buck's (1892-1973) classic novel earned her a Pulitzer Prize for its timeless portrait of family members confronting change and one another. Wang Lung, a farmer caring for his aged father in prerevolutionary 1920s China, begs a bride from the wealthy House of Hwang nearby. The matriarch gives him O-Lan, a kitchen slave thought "somewhat slow and stupid." But O-Lan's ingenuity helps the couple's hard work gain them prosperity, children, and land. Yet, as the pair age, political and social upheavals interacting with all--too-human desires disrupt their lives and marriage. Worse, Wang's sons do not love the land as he does. Bertozzi's scratchy realism spotlights the characters and their emotions, with just enough scene-setting for context. The limited colors-putty-pinkish and blue with red accents-give surprising scope for emphasis. VERDICT The focus on characters lets readers see Wang as Everyman and O-Lan as Everywoman across history. This sensitive adaptation makes the novel come alive for new readers, with likely appeal for fans of historical dramas such as Downton Abbey.-MC © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Pearl S. Buck, June 26, 1892 - March 6, 1973 Pearl Sydenstricker Buck was an American author, best know for her novels about China. Buck was born on June 26, 1892, in Hillsboro, West Virginia, but as the daughter of Presbyterian missionaries she was taken to China in infancy. She received her early education in Shanghai, but returned to the United States to attend college, and graduated from Randolph-Macon Woman's College in Virginia in 1914. Buck became a university teacher there and married John Lossing Buck, an agricultural economist, in 1917. <p> Buck and her husband both taught in China, and she published magazine articles about life there. Her first novel East Wind, West Wind was published in 1930. Buck achieved international success with The Good Earth, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932. This story of a Chinese peasant family's struggle for survival was later made into a MGM film. <p> Buck resigned from the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions after publishing an article that was critical of missionaries. She returned to the United States because of political unrest in China. Buck's novels during this period include Sons, A House Divided, and The Mother. She also wrote biographies of her father (Fighting Angel) and her mother (The Exile). She won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938. <p> During her career, Buck published over 70 books: novels, nonfiction, story collections, children's books, and translations from the Chinese. She also wrote under the pseudonym John Sedges. <p> In the United States, Buck was active in the civil rights and women's rights movements. In 1942 she founded the East and West Association to promote understanding between Asia and the West. In 1949, Buck established Welcome House, the first international interracial adoption agency. In 1964, she established the Pearl S. Buck foundation to sponsor support for Amerasian children who were not considered adoptable. <p> Pearl Buck died in Danbury, Vermont, on March 6, 1973. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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