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The fateful alliance : France, Russia, and the coming of the First World War / George F. Kennan.

By: Kennan, George F. (George Frost), 1904-2005.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Pantheon Books, c1984Edition: 1st ed.Description: xx, 300 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0394534948; 9780394534947; 0719017076 (MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY PR); 9780719017070 (MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY PR).Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Causes | Russia -- Foreign relations -- France | France -- Foreign relations -- Russia | France -- Foreign relations -- 1870-1940 | Russia -- Foreign relations -- 1894-1917 | Triple Alliance, 1882 | France Foreign relations 1870-1940 | France Foreign relations Russia | Russia Foreign relations 1894-1917 | Russia Foreign relations France | Triple Alliance, 1882 | World War, 1914-1918 CausesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Fateful alliance.DDC classification: 940.3/11 Other classification: 15.70 | 89.70
Contents:
Politics and personalities, 1890 -- The turning point of 1890 -- The Narva maneuvers -- The "Entente Cordiale" -- Private stirrings -- The discussions resumed -- Cronstadt -- The ulterior relationships -- The military convention I -- The prelude to negotiation -- The military convention II -- Panama and Mohrenheim -- The convention adopted -- The Aftermath ; Epilogue -- App. I: Exchange of letters: N.K. Giers, A. Mohrenheim and Alexander Ribot, August 1891 -- App. II: Memorandum: N.N. Obruchev to N.K. Giers, May 1892 -- App. III: Exchange of notes: N.K. Giers and Ambassador Montebello, 1893-1894 ; Text of August 1892 military convention signed by N.N. Obruchev and Raoul le Mouton de Boisdeffre.
Summary: An analysis of the Russian-French alliance of 1894 and what went wrong in Europe at the end of the nineteenth century.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D511 .K34 1984 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100055672

Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-284) and index.

Politics and personalities, 1890 -- The turning point of 1890 -- The Narva maneuvers -- The "Entente Cordiale" -- Private stirrings -- The discussions resumed -- Cronstadt -- The ulterior relationships -- The military convention I -- The prelude to negotiation -- The military convention II -- Panama and Mohrenheim -- The convention adopted -- The Aftermath ; Epilogue -- App. I: Exchange of letters: N.K. Giers, A. Mohrenheim and Alexander Ribot, August 1891 -- App. II: Memorandum: N.N. Obruchev to N.K. Giers, May 1892 -- App. III: Exchange of notes: N.K. Giers and Ambassador Montebello, 1893-1894 ; Text of August 1892 military convention signed by N.N. Obruchev and Raoul le Mouton de Boisdeffre.

An analysis of the Russian-French alliance of 1894 and what went wrong in Europe at the end of the nineteenth century.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

George F. Kennan, February 16, 1904 - March 17, 2005 George Kennan was born Feb. 16, 1904, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He attended Saint John's Military Academy and then Princeton University, graduating in 1926 and entering the diplomatic corps. He travelled to Genoa in 1927, and in 1929 was assigned as third secretary attached to all of the Baltic Republics. In 1933, he went to Moscow with Ambassador William Bullitt, where he remained until 1937. He then spent a year in the U. S., a year in Prague, and then went to the U. S. Embassy in Berlin where he helped to develop a peace settlement. Kennan was in Berlin when Nazi Germany declared war on the U. S., and was interned for several months, before finally returning to the States in May of 1942. <p> During the war, he represented the U. S. in Portugal, and was part of the delegation to the European Advisory Commission. In 1944 he returned to the embassy in Moscow. In April 1947, after returning to the States, Kennan became chairman of the Policy Planning Staff at the State Department. It was there that he penned an anonymous article, titled "The Sources of Soviet Conduct" but better known as the "X article", in the July 1947 Foreign Affairs, which advocated a containment policy. He is considered to have been the "architect" of the Cold War. <p> Kennan was appointed Ambassador to the Soviet Union in 1952, but was recalled in October after a diplomatic incident in Berlin where he compared the Soviet Union to Nazi Germany. Kennan retired from the Foreign Service in 1953, and joined the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, where he remained until retirement. During that time he also served as Ambassador to the USSR and to Yugoslavia for a short time. <p> Kennan has continued to write and lecture on foreign policy and the Soviet Union into the '90s. In 1981 he was awarded the Albert Einstein Peace Prize for his efforts to improve U.S.-Soviet relations. He also won the Pulitzer Prize twice, initially in 1957 for Russia Leaves the War: Soviet-American Relations, 1917-192O, and then again in 1968 for Memoirs. At age 85, he received the Medal of Freedom. <p> George F. Kennan died on March 17, 2005 at the age of 101. <p> (Bowker Author Biography) George F. Kennan has won both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. He is professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. <p> (Publisher Provided)

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