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The radical and the Republican : Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the triumph of antislavery politics / James Oakes.

By: Oakes, James.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Co., c2007Edition: 1st ed.Description: xxii, 328 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780393330656 (pbk.); 0393330656 (pbk.); 9780393061949 (hardcover); 0393061949 (hardcover).Subject(s): Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895 | Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 | African American abolitionists -- Biography | Presidents -- United States -- Biography | Slavery -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Antislavery movements -- United States -- History -- 19th century | United States -- Politics and government -- 1861-1865 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1857-1861 | United States -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century | Friendship -- United States -- Case studiesDDC classification: 973.7/1140922 LOC classification: E449.D75 | O15 2007
Contents:
"I won't stop until I reach the United States Senate" -- "I have always hated slavery" -- "I cannot support Lincoln" -- "This thunderbolt will keep" -- "We must free the slaves or be ourselves subdued" -- "My friend, Frederick Douglass" -- "Had Lincoln lived--"
Summary: This is a book about two towering figures in our nation's history. It is a moving story about an improbable friendship, and an important story about an equally improbable alliance. [In the book, the author] has written a ... narrative history. He brings these two iconic figures to life and sheds new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality in Civil War America.-Dust jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E449 .D75 O15 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001999986

Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-304) and index.

"I won't stop until I reach the United States Senate" -- "I have always hated slavery" -- "I cannot support Lincoln" -- "This thunderbolt will keep" -- "We must free the slaves or be ourselves subdued" -- "My friend, Frederick Douglass" -- "Had Lincoln lived--"

This is a book about two towering figures in our nation's history. It is a moving story about an improbable friendship, and an important story about an equally improbable alliance. [In the book, the author] has written a ... narrative history. He brings these two iconic figures to life and sheds new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality in Civil War America.-Dust jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln are two of the most famous men of their age, powerful orators, writers, and political actors. While their lives, goals, and circles of influence were markedly different--Lincoln inside the power structure and Douglass very much outside--both were vocally opposed to slavery in a time when slavery was the country's foremost political issue. Oakes (history, Graduate Ctr., CUNY) argues that political experience and practical considerations softened each man's perspective on the politics surrounding slavery, and this led to their alliance. Oakes's book is distinct in providing a history of the Civil War strictly through Lincoln and Douglass, and for this alone it is worthwhile. But the book can also be read for Oakes's intelligent account of each man's personal, moral, and political objections to slavery and for his substantive discussion of the evolution of each man's perspective. An excellent bibliographic essay follows the text. Essential for academic libraries and strongly recommended for public libraries.--Emily-Jane Dawson, Multnomah Cty. Lib., Portland, OR (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.

CHOICE Review

The duality of this book's title articulates its central theme. At first blush, it would appear that Frederick Douglass is the "radical" and Abraham Lincoln the "Republican" in this study of Civil War-era race and slavery. But Oakes (CUNY Graduate Center) is interested in the convergence of the two--a process in which Lincoln becomes a radical and Douglass a committed Republican. A close study of Lincoln's and Douglass's ideas, pronouncements, and shifting positions on the issues of race and politics reveals a great deal about the reasons for emancipation's ultimate triumph. Oakes's work is more a meditative essay on democracy and reform than a dual biography; it is, however, a richly detailed and nuanced examination of these weighty historical issues through the eyes of two of the period's most significant yet difficult to understand figures. A breezy and colloquial narrative (perhaps overly so on occasion, with a superficial and cavalier assessment of John Brown's raid) renders the book accessible to a wide audience while maintaining the texture and depth that distinguish it as a work of keen historical analysis. Thought provoking and judicious, this important book deserves a wide audience. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All collections. K. M. Gannon Grand View College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James Oakes is the author of several acclaimed books on slavery and the Civil War. His history of emancipation, Freedom National, won the Lincoln Prize and was longlisted for the National Book Award. He is Distinguished Professor of History and Graduate School Humanities Professor at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

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