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Hitler's army : soldiers, Nazis, and war in the Third Reich / Omer Bartov.

By: Bartov, Omer.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1992Description: xiv, 238 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0195079035 (pbk.); 9780195079036 (pbk.).Subject(s): Germany -- Armed Forces -- History -- 20th century | Germany -- Armed Forces -- Political activity | National socialism | World War, 1939-1945 -- Atrocities | World War 2 Army operationsDDC classification: 940.541343 | 940.540943 Other classification: NQ 2300
Contents:
The demodernization of the front -- The destruction of the primary group -- The perversion of discipline -- The distortion of reality.
Summary: In Hitler's Army, Omer Bartov successfully challenges the prevailing view that the German Army of World War II was an apolitical, professional fighting force, having little to do with the Nazi Party. Bartov focuses on the titanic struggle between Germany and the Soviet Union -- where the vast majority of German troops fought -- to show how the savagery of war reshaped the army in Hitler's image. Both brutalized and brutalizing, these soldiers needed to see their bitter sacrifices as noble patriotism and to justify their own atrocities by seeing their victims as subhuman. - Back cover.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D757 .B27 1992 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001999366

"First issued as an Oxford University Press paperback, 1992"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-231) and index.

The demodernization of the front -- The destruction of the primary group -- The perversion of discipline -- The distortion of reality.

In Hitler's Army, Omer Bartov successfully challenges the prevailing view that the German Army of World War II was an apolitical, professional fighting force, having little to do with the Nazi Party. Bartov focuses on the titanic struggle between Germany and the Soviet Union -- where the vast majority of German troops fought -- to show how the savagery of war reshaped the army in Hitler's image. Both brutalized and brutalizing, these soldiers needed to see their bitter sacrifices as noble patriotism and to justify their own atrocities by seeing their victims as subhuman. - Back cover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Israeli historian Omer Bartov, author of the well-received study The Eastern Front, 1941-45: German Troops and the Barbarisation of Warfare (CH, Nov'86), expands on that topic in this persuasively argued monograph. In four interrelated essays he maintains that in Russia, the highly mechanized and hitherto triumphant Wehrmacht was unexpectedly plunged into primitive and prolonged static warfare similar to 1914-18. Rapidly mounting casualties soon destroyed its unit cohesion, and genocidal orders directed against Soviet commissars, Jews, and other "undesirable elements," as well as the ruthless plunder of the occupied territories, threatened its vaunted discipline. The response was an enthusiastic embrace of Nazi ideology by officers and troops of the Eastern Army as a source of motivation, combined with draconian punishment for violations of military law not involving mistreatment of civilians and POWs. In literally becoming Hitler's soldiers, the Wehrmacht could psychologically sublimate criminal behavior even reverse its onus upon their victims. This thought-provoking, widely researched, and explicitly revisionist account will interest students of the Third Reich and its aftermath. All levels.-L. D. Stokes, Dalhousie University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Omer Bartov is Junior Fellow with Society of Fellows, Harvard University.

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