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The Atlantic and its enemies : a personal history of the Cold War / Norman Stone.

By: Stone, Norman, 1941-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Basic Books, c2010Description: xix, 668 p., [24] p of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780465020430 (hbk.); 0465020437 (hbk.); 9780465028436; 0465028438.Subject(s): Cold War | World politics -- 20th century | Europe -- History -- 20th century | Soviet Union -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1991 | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1989 | History, Modern -- 20th century | Civilization, Modern -- 20th century | War and society | Military history, Modern -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 327.09/04 LOC classification: D840 | .S735 2010
Contents:
The war of the British succession -- Cold War -- Marshall -- The NATO system -- Communism in China -- The world at the death of Stalin -- Khrushchev -- Europe and the wider world -- Europe 1958 -- the sixties -- Berlin-Cuba-Vietnam -- America in Vietnam -- Nixon in China -- Unraveling -- 1968: a generation -- Atlantic crisis 1974-1979 -- 'The British disease' -- Europe: the Phoenix flops -- The Kremlin consolations -- Reaction -- Atlantic recovery: 'Reagan and Thatcher' -- Reagan -- Brumaire: two coups -- The eighties -- Floreal -- Chichikov -- Restoration -- 'Ending history'.
Summary: Discusses the abundance of Communist military and cultural successes during the Cold War and the sudden triumph of the British and American financial systems and ideology.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D840 .S735 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002002822

Includes bibliographical references (p. 599-604) and index.

The war of the British succession -- Cold War -- Marshall -- The NATO system -- Communism in China -- The world at the death of Stalin -- Khrushchev -- Europe and the wider world -- Europe 1958 -- the sixties -- Berlin-Cuba-Vietnam -- America in Vietnam -- Nixon in China -- Unraveling -- 1968: a generation -- Atlantic crisis 1974-1979 -- 'The British disease' -- Europe: the Phoenix flops -- The Kremlin consolations -- Reaction -- Atlantic recovery: 'Reagan and Thatcher' -- Reagan -- Brumaire: two coups -- The eighties -- Floreal -- Chichikov -- Restoration -- 'Ending history'.

Discusses the abundance of Communist military and cultural successes during the Cold War and the sudden triumph of the British and American financial systems and ideology.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Of the writing of histories of the Cold War, there is no end. Stone (history & Russian studies, Bilkent Univ., Turkey), one of Great Britain's most distinguished historians, now offers his own assessment of the period between the end of World War II and the fall of the Soviet Union. In many respects, this latest outing continues Stone's earlier and well-received study of the first part of the 20th century, Europe Transformed, 1878-1919. Stone covers the now-familiar contest between the Soviet Union and the United States, a contest probably best treated in Derek Leebaert's The Fifty-Year Wound: How America's Cold War Victory Has Shaped Our World. Stone's writing style is a bit challenging with long, complex sentences and page-long paragraphs, but he does bring decades of erudition to his analysis; moreover, he lived in Eastern Europe during part of the period under review and brings that perspective to his work as well. VERDICT For those collecting or reading comprehensively on the history of the Cold War.-Ed Goedeken, Iowa State Univ. Lib., Ames (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Stone's "personal history" is a somewhat eccentric account, focusing considerably more attention on Turkey, Greece, Chile, and the Thatcher administration in the UK than one would expect in a balanced work on the Cold War. Told largely from a British/Turkish point of view, the book is rather critical of the European Community. Virtually no leaders or intellectuals emerge unscathed from the author's criticisms, which are selective but sometimes extensive. Stone (Univ. of Bilkent, Turkey) sees a few politicians as heroic and relatively successful: for example, Margaret Thatcher (for whom Stone was a speechwriter) and General Pinochet. He is especially critical of E. H. Carr and generally savages liberals, radicals, and Keynesians, but does not spare conservatives. Stone is particularly hard on the welfare state and on bureaucrats. Much of his commentary is based on a monetarist interpretation of economics. Not a scholarly work in a traditional sense, the book has no footnotes or endnotes and a very brief bibliography. Stone is a talented writer, but anyone not reasonably well informed on the topics covered will find this book heavy going. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. P. Scherer emeritus, Indiana University at South Bend

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Norman Stone is the author of World War One, The Eastern Front 1914-1917 (winner of the Wolfson Prize), and Europe Transformed . He has taught at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford, and Bilkent, where he is now Director of the Turkish-Russian Center. He lives in Oxford and Istanbul.

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