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Why Texans fought in the Civil War / Charles David Grear.

By: Grear, Charles D, 1976-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Sam Rayburn series on rural life: no. 20.Publisher: College Station : Texas A and M University Press, [2010]Copyright date: ©2010Edition: 1st ed.Description: xiii, 239 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781603441728 (cloth : alk. paper); 1603441727 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Texas -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 | Soldiers -- Texas -- Attitudes -- History -- 19th century | Soldiers -- Texas -- Psychology -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 976.4/05
Contents:
Into the fray : why Texans fought in the Civil War -- Defense of the Lone Star State : why Texans fought in the Trans-Mississippi -- Defense of their former homes : why Texans fought east of the Mississippi River -- Demoralization and desertion : why Texans returned to the Lone Star State during the war -- Fighting in a new land : why foreign immigrants and minorities in Texas fought.
Summary: "In why Texans fought in the Civil War, Charles David Grear provides insights into what motivated Texans to fight for the Confederacy. Mining important primary sources -- including thousands of letters and unpublished journals -- he affords readers the opportunity to hear, often in the combatants' own words, why it was so important to them to engage in tumultuous struggles occurring so far from home. As Grear notes, in the decade prior to the Civil War the population of Texas had tripled. The state was increasingly populated by immigrants from all parts of the South and foreign countries. When the war began, it was not just Texas that many of these soldiers enlisted to protect, but also their native states, where they had family ties"--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E580 .G74 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002007425

Includes bibliographical references (pages 213-230) and index.

Into the fray : why Texans fought in the Civil War -- Defense of the Lone Star State : why Texans fought in the Trans-Mississippi -- Defense of their former homes : why Texans fought east of the Mississippi River -- Demoralization and desertion : why Texans returned to the Lone Star State during the war -- Fighting in a new land : why foreign immigrants and minorities in Texas fought.

"In why Texans fought in the Civil War, Charles David Grear provides insights into what motivated Texans to fight for the Confederacy. Mining important primary sources -- including thousands of letters and unpublished journals -- he affords readers the opportunity to hear, often in the combatants' own words, why it was so important to them to engage in tumultuous struggles occurring so far from home. As Grear notes, in the decade prior to the Civil War the population of Texas had tripled. The state was increasingly populated by immigrants from all parts of the South and foreign countries. When the war began, it was not just Texas that many of these soldiers enlisted to protect, but also their native states, where they had family ties"--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This well-researched, deftly written book examines a little-considered aspect of Texas participation in the Civil War: why Texans fought in the conflict with ardor and strong commitment. Grear (Prairie View A&M Univ.) mostly focuses on Confederate service, although a few Texans did rally to the Union. The author has currycombed thousands of letters, diaries, memoirs, and journals written by participants to understand why soldiers from the Lone Star state supported the South, especially when Texas was geographically located on the Confederacy's western edge, had great diversity of population, and military service meant fighting far to the east in areas distant from home. Importantly, the narrative notes that many Texans were recent immigrants to the state, meaning many of them identified with other places eastward across the South. Grear also concludes that an individual soldier's attachments proved to be the most compelling factor for military service. These included emotional ties based on networks of familiar kinship structures, identity based on southern social institutions, and an immersion in the culture of the South. The book makes an important contribution to understanding Texas and Texans in the Civil War. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. L. T. Cummins Austin College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>CHARLES DAVID GREAR, who received his PhD in history from Texas Christian University, is an assistant professor of history at Prairie View A&M University. He holds a PhD from Texas Christian University.</p>

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