Texas in the Confederacy : an experiment in nation building / Clayton E. Jewett.

By: Jewett, Clayton EMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Shades of blue and gray series: Publisher: Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2002Description: vii, 310 p. : maps ; 25 cmISBN: 0826213901 (alk. paper); 9780826213907 (alk. paper)Subject(s): Texas -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 | Texas -- Politics and government -- 1861-1865 | Texas -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Social aspects | Group identity -- Texas -- History -- 19th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Texas in the Confederacy.DDC classification: 973.7/13/09764 LOC classification: E580 | .J49 2002
Contents:
Defining a Separate Identity -- "The Cold Sweat of Death": Texas Prosecession and Antisecession Politics -- In Defense of Liberty and Property: The Secession Movement -- Establishing a Separate Identity -- The Bleeding Frontier: Indian Conflict, 1861-1862 -- Defending the State: Texas Military Enlistment -- Securing a Separate Identity -- The Production and Supply of Necessary Material: Texas Institutions, Cloth, Salt, and Iron -- "In Disregard and Defiance": The Cotton-Trade Controversy -- Implementing a Separate Identity -- "Her Present and Proud Condition": Railroads, Education, Mutual-Aid Societies, and Asylums -- Regression Analysis: Support for Secession -- Regression Analysis: Military Enlistment -- County Military Enlistment -- Regression Analysis: Ninth Legislature -- Regression Analysis: Tenth Legislature -- Legislative Participation and Support.
Review: "Historians examining the Confederacy have often assumed the existence of a monolithic South unified behind the politics and culture of slavery. In addition, they have argued for the emergence of a strong central state government in the Confederacy. In Texas in the Confederacy, Clayton E. Jewett challenges these assumptions by examining Texas politics with an emphasis on the virtually neglected topic of the Texas legislature. In doing so, Jewett shows that an examination of state legislative activity during this period is essential to understanding Texas's relationship with the Indian tribes, the states in Trans-Mississippi Department, and the Confederate government."--BOOK JACKET.
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E580 .G37 2011 Tejanos in gray : E580 .G6 1971 Cannon smoke: E580 .G74 2010 Why Texans fought in the Civil War / E580 .J49 2002 Texas in the Confederacy : E580 .P54 2000 Brush men & vigilantes : E580 .S43 2009 The seventh star of the Confederacy : E580 .T46 Ten more Texans in gray /

Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-305) and index.

Defining a Separate Identity -- "The Cold Sweat of Death": Texas Prosecession and Antisecession Politics -- In Defense of Liberty and Property: The Secession Movement -- Establishing a Separate Identity -- The Bleeding Frontier: Indian Conflict, 1861-1862 -- Defending the State: Texas Military Enlistment -- Securing a Separate Identity -- The Production and Supply of Necessary Material: Texas Institutions, Cloth, Salt, and Iron -- "In Disregard and Defiance": The Cotton-Trade Controversy -- Implementing a Separate Identity -- "Her Present and Proud Condition": Railroads, Education, Mutual-Aid Societies, and Asylums -- Regression Analysis: Support for Secession -- Regression Analysis: Military Enlistment -- County Military Enlistment -- Regression Analysis: Ninth Legislature -- Regression Analysis: Tenth Legislature -- Legislative Participation and Support.

"Historians examining the Confederacy have often assumed the existence of a monolithic South unified behind the politics and culture of slavery. In addition, they have argued for the emergence of a strong central state government in the Confederacy. In Texas in the Confederacy, Clayton E. Jewett challenges these assumptions by examining Texas politics with an emphasis on the virtually neglected topic of the Texas legislature. In doing so, Jewett shows that an examination of state legislative activity during this period is essential to understanding Texas's relationship with the Indian tribes, the states in Trans-Mississippi Department, and the Confederate government."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Jewett (Austin Community College) adds a fresh dimension to the problematic process of nation building by examining in detail the relationship between Texas and the Confederate government. He maintains that Texans' desire for economic security (broadly defined) was the axis on which relations between the state and Confederacy turned. At a rhetorical level, secessionists and their opponents cast the sectional conflict in terms of the state's responsibility to defend the material interests of the citizenry. In defense of those economic concerns, Texans waged war against Indian tribes within the state rather than against the Union, enlisted in greater numbers in state militias instead of the Confederate army, resisted attempts by the Confederate government to exert more authority and control over the state's economy (especially over cotton production and consumption), and supported economic initiatives to promote railroads, education, and mutual aid societies. The effect--if not the intent--of these tensions between Texas and the Confederacy was the creation of an identity separate from that of the other southern states. Jewett's analysis relies heavily on a close examination of state legislation and, even more, quantitative analysis. His argument is provocative, suggestive, but not beyond challenge. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. Morrison Purdue University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Clayton E. Jewett is Adjunct Professor of History at Austin Community College in Texas.

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