You are not a gadget : a manifesto / Jaron Lanier.

By: Lanier, JaronMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Random House, 2011Edition: 1st edDescription: xiii, 223 p. ; 21 cmISBN: 9780307389978 (pbk.); 0307389979 (pbk.)Subject(s): Information technology -- Social aspects | Technological innovations -- Social aspects | Technology -- Social aspectsDDC classification: 303.48/33
Contents:
What is a person? -- Missing persons -- An apocalypse of self-abdication -- The noosphere is just another name for everyone's inner troll -- What will money be? -- Digital peasant chic -- The city is built to music -- The lords of the clouds renounce free will in order to become infinitely lucky -- The prospects for humanistic cloud economics -- Three possible future directions -- The unbearable thinness of flatness -- Retropolis -- Digital creativity eludes flat places -- All hail the membrane -- Making the best of bits -- I am a contrarian loop -- One story of how semantics might have evolved -- Future humors -- Home at last (my love affair with Bachelardian neoteny).
Summary: A computer-age visionary argues that the Internet has failed to live up to its early promises, sharing cautionary perspectives on the Web 2.0 design concept while optimistically evaluating the Internet as a positive cultural vehicle.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HM851 .L358 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002018091
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HM851 .B3665 2012 The social media strategist : HM851 .C45 2011 Always on : HM851 .F592 2014 The 4th revolution : HM851 .L358 2011 You are not a gadget : HM851 .M3327 2012 Consent of the networked : HM851 .P34 2008 Born digital : HM851 .R3633 2016 The seventh sense :

First Vintage books edition.

Index.

What is a person? -- Missing persons -- An apocalypse of self-abdication -- The noosphere is just another name for everyone's inner troll -- What will money be? -- Digital peasant chic -- The city is built to music -- The lords of the clouds renounce free will in order to become infinitely lucky -- The prospects for humanistic cloud economics -- Three possible future directions -- The unbearable thinness of flatness -- Retropolis -- Digital creativity eludes flat places -- All hail the membrane -- Making the best of bits -- I am a contrarian loop -- One story of how semantics might have evolved -- Future humors -- Home at last (my love affair with Bachelardian neoteny).

A computer-age visionary argues that the Internet has failed to live up to its early promises, sharing cautionary perspectives on the Web 2.0 design concept while optimistically evaluating the Internet as a positive cultural vehicle.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Popularly known for his ruminations on the social pathology of information technology, computer scientist Lanier is immensely concerned that the design patterns of today's omnipresent 2.0 web services are about to be locked in. He argues that technology prophets from many disciplines have us blissfully ignorant of the sacrifices we make when submerging our individual identities into online collectives like Facebook. In addition, the web's early promise in terms of innovation, democracy, and interpersonal communication has not come to be; instead, an online culture has emerged that undermines the foundation of the knowledge economy. Flows of information, Lanier notes, are more important than what is being shared, whole expressions of creativity and arguments are replaced by fragments, and authors are successful by simply reusing the past instead of producing genuinely new works. Still, Lanier is optimistic that it's not too late to move away from cybernetic totalism by taking the "red pill" his book offers-for the web does not design itself, we design it. Verdict If you can't imagine a world without today's social technologies, this is a must read for 2010. [100,000-copy first printing; see Prepub Alert, LJ 9/1/09.]-James A. Buczynski, Seneca Coll. of Applied Arts & Technology, Toronto (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Many hail Web 2.0 as an empowering phenomenon that has brought about a democratization of information. But here, in his first book, Silicon Valley insider Lanier offers a radically different perspective. Widely regarded as the "father of virtual reality," Lanier argues that the structure of Web 2.0 violates the integrity of the individual by discouraging reasoned discourse in favor of intellectually flawed groupthink. Lanier skillfully constructs his argument by tracing the historical antecedents of social software to explain how design limitations constrain human behavior. Describing Web 2.0 as seductively dangerous in its ubiquity, he challenges the reader to consider how concepts like group consensus, mashups, blogs, and a glut of off-the-cuff communication affects the evaluation of information, human interaction, economics, and social class. He urges the reader to consider technology as a tool that should serve humanity instead of being unconsciously controlled by technology. Lanier's message, though impassioned, is optimistic and persuasive. His thesis goes against the grain, and for this reason alone, this work offers a valuable alternative to the predominance of popular discourse favoring social software. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels of readership. S. M. Frey Indiana State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jaron Lanier is known as the father of virtual reality technology and has worked on the interface between computer science and medicine, physics, and neuroscience. He lives in Berkeley, California.
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Visit the author's website at www.jaronlanier.com.

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