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Access controlled : the shaping of power, rights, and rule in cyberspace / Ronald Deibert [and others], editors.

Contributor(s): Deibert, Ronald | Palfrey, John G. (John Gorham), 1972- | Rohozinski, Rafal | Zittrain, Jonathan (Jonathan L.), 1969- | OpenNet Initiative.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Information revolution & global politics: Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, [2010]Copyright date: ©2010Description: xvi, 617 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780262014342 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0262014343 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780262514354 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0262514354 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Cyberspace -- Government policy | Internet -- Government policy | Computers -- Access control | Internet -- CensorshipAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Access controlled.DDC classification: 005.8
Contents:
Beyond denial : introducing next-generation information access controls / Ronald Deibert and Rafal Rohozinski -- Control and subversion in Russian cyberspace / Ronald Deibert and Rafal Rohozinski -- The EU data retention directive in an era of Internet surveillance / Hal Roberts and John Palfrey -- Barriers to cooperation : an analysis of the origins of international efforts to protect children online / Nart Villeneuve -- Intermediary censorship / Ethan Zuckerman -- Protecting privacy and expression online : can the Global Network Initiative embrace the character of the Net? / Colin M. Maclay -- Introduction to the country profiles -- Commonwealth of Independent States : CIS overview ; Armenia ; Azerbaijan ; Belarus ; Georgia ; Kazakhstan ; Kyrgyzstan ; Moldova ; Russia ; Tajikistan ; Turkmenistan ; Ukraine ; Uzbekistan -- Europe : Europe overview ; France ; Germany ; Italy ; Nordic countries ; Turkey ; United Kingdom -- North America : United States and Canada overview -- Australia and New Zealand : Australia and New Zealand overview -- Asia : Asia overview ; Burma ; China ; Pakistan ; South Korea -- Middle East and North Africa : MENA overview ; Egypt ; Iran ; Saudi Arabia ; Syria ; Tunisia ; United Arab Emirates.
Summary: Internet censorship and surveillance are increasing in democratic countries as well as in authoritarian states. The first-generation controls, typified by China's "Great Firewall," are being replaced by more sophisticated techniques that go beyond mere denial of information and aim to normalize (or even legalize) a climate of control. These next-generation techniques include strategically timed distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, targeted malware, surveillance at key points of the Internet's infrastructure, take-down notices, and stringent terms-of-usage policies. Their aim is to shape and limit the national information environment. Access Controlled reports on these new trends in information control and their implications for the global internet commons. Access Controlled is a publication of the OpenNet Initiative (ONI), a collaboration of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto's Munk Centre for International Studies, Harvard's Berlman Center for Internet and Society, and the SecDev Group (Ottawa), and is an extension of ONI's earlier volume, Access Denied. Six substantial chapters analyzing internet controls worldwide are supplemented by a section of shorter regional reports and country profiles drawn from material gathered by the ONI through a combination of technical interrogations and field research methods. Support for Access Controlled was provided by the Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HM851 .A254 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002012391

Report from the OpenNet Initiative.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Beyond denial : introducing next-generation information access controls / Ronald Deibert and Rafal Rohozinski -- Control and subversion in Russian cyberspace / Ronald Deibert and Rafal Rohozinski -- The EU data retention directive in an era of Internet surveillance / Hal Roberts and John Palfrey -- Barriers to cooperation : an analysis of the origins of international efforts to protect children online / Nart Villeneuve -- Intermediary censorship / Ethan Zuckerman -- Protecting privacy and expression online : can the Global Network Initiative embrace the character of the Net? / Colin M. Maclay -- Introduction to the country profiles -- Commonwealth of Independent States : CIS overview ; Armenia ; Azerbaijan ; Belarus ; Georgia ; Kazakhstan ; Kyrgyzstan ; Moldova ; Russia ; Tajikistan ; Turkmenistan ; Ukraine ; Uzbekistan -- Europe : Europe overview ; France ; Germany ; Italy ; Nordic countries ; Turkey ; United Kingdom -- North America : United States and Canada overview -- Australia and New Zealand : Australia and New Zealand overview -- Asia : Asia overview ; Burma ; China ; Pakistan ; South Korea -- Middle East and North Africa : MENA overview ; Egypt ; Iran ; Saudi Arabia ; Syria ; Tunisia ; United Arab Emirates.

Internet censorship and surveillance are increasing in democratic countries as well as in authoritarian states. The first-generation controls, typified by China's "Great Firewall," are being replaced by more sophisticated techniques that go beyond mere denial of information and aim to normalize (or even legalize) a climate of control. These next-generation techniques include strategically timed distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, targeted malware, surveillance at key points of the Internet's infrastructure, take-down notices, and stringent terms-of-usage policies. Their aim is to shape and limit the national information environment. Access Controlled reports on these new trends in information control and their implications for the global internet commons. Access Controlled is a publication of the OpenNet Initiative (ONI), a collaboration of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto's Munk Centre for International Studies, Harvard's Berlman Center for Internet and Society, and the SecDev Group (Ottawa), and is an extension of ONI's earlier volume, Access Denied. Six substantial chapters analyzing internet controls worldwide are supplemented by a section of shorter regional reports and country profiles drawn from material gathered by the ONI through a combination of technical interrogations and field research methods. Support for Access Controlled was provided by the Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This work might be better titled "The 2010 World Almanac of Internet Censorship." The editors' failure to provide the drama hinted at in the original title is, however, a good thing. Many authors are willing to weigh in on the evils and inevitability of Internet censorship, but this book presents the facts with a minimum of stumping. A work of the OpenNet Initiative (CH, Jun'10, 47-5370), it is a follow-up to Access Denied (CH, Aug'08, 45-6833). It presents the results of testing in 65 countries to assess levels and methods of censorship in the context of related social factors. The change of title from "denied" to "controlled" reflects a change in the methods of censorship used. It departs from the old method of simply blocking undesirable content to taking a more direct approach of regulation and covert operations to control and compromise unwanted sites--a step from building walls into proactive cyberwarfare. If much of the material in this work were not freely available online, it would be an essential purchase for libraries. Nonetheless, it is still an important acquisition for academics and professionals; it also supports the work of the OpenNet Initiative. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through professionals. P. L. Kantor Southern Vermont College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Ronald Deibert is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk Centre for International Studies at the University of Toronto. John Palfrey is Henry N. Ess II Professor of Law and Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources at Harvard Law School. Rafal Rohozinski is a Principal with the SecDev Group, a global strategy and research analytics firm. Jonathan Zittrain is Professor at Harvard Law School and the author of The Future of the Internet--And How to Stop It. Deibert, Palfrey, Rohozinski, and Zittrain are the coeditors of Access Denied: The Practice and Policy of Global Internet Filtering (MIT Press, 2008).</p>

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