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A New Deal for Native art : Indian arts and federal policy, 1933-1943 / Jennifer McLerran.

By: McLerran, Jennifer.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2009Description: 299 p. : ill., map ; 27 cm.ISBN: 9780816527663 (cloth : alk. paper); 0816527660 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Indian arts -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Indian handicraft industries -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Indians of North America -- Government relations -- 1934- | New Deal, 1933-1939 | United States -- Cultural policyDDC classification: 323.1197 LOC classification: E98.A73 | M37 2009
Contents:
Introduction: A New Deal for Native art -- Saving Native arts from the tourist -- A folk culture for the Americas -- The development of a new federal Indian policy -- Indian arts and crafts cooperatives and Indian extension service arts and crafts programs -- Museum display of Indian art -- Indian New Deal mural projects -- The Civilian Conservation Corps, Indian Division.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E98 .A73 M37 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002020212

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Introduction: A New Deal for Native art -- Saving Native arts from the tourist -- A folk culture for the Americas -- The development of a new federal Indian policy -- Indian arts and crafts cooperatives and Indian extension service arts and crafts programs -- Museum display of Indian art -- Indian New Deal mural projects -- The Civilian Conservation Corps, Indian Division.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Museum of Northern Arizona curator McLerran criticizes Robert Fay Schrader (The Indian Arts and Crafts Board, CH, Dec'83) and Susan Meyn (More than Curiosities, CH, Mar'02, 39-4182) for presenting histories rather than analyses and states that her goal is to show that the New Deal Indian policy presented Indian art and artists as preindustrial or premodern others, not as part of the contemporary US. She argues that John Collier and Rene d'Harnoncourt, the men responsible for the Indian arts segment of the New Deal, were romantic primitivists whose efforts to preserve (or revive) and market traditional arts served the colonialist attitudes of most Americans, especially the wealthy. Most of the book describes the development of the New Deal Indian art policy, with emphasis on Collier and d'Harnoncourt. McLerran also discusses various programs that were created to market Indian art. Students will have difficulty with the chapters on policy, but the chapters describing the programs and their outcomes are important historical summaries of events in the development of Native American art. The author draws examples from Indian art, but there is no indication of how the artists regarded their association with the New Deal. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. J. Schneider emerita, University of North Dakota

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jennifer McLerran is a curator at the Museum of Northern Arizona and an assistant professor of art history at Northern Arizona University. She is the editor of Weaving Is Life: Navajo Weavings from the Edwin L. and Ruth E. Kennedy Southwest Native American Collection .

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