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Niche news : the politics of news choice / Natalie Jomini Stroud.

By: Stroud, Natalie Jomini.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, c2011Description: vi, 257 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780199755509 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0199755507 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780199755516 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0199755515 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Mass media -- United States -- Audiences | Mass media and public opinion -- United States | Press and politics -- United States | Television broadcasting of news -- United States | Radio journalism -- United StatesDDC classification: 302.23
Contents:
Partisans make the news -- Selective exposure in theory and in practice -- Using niche news -- Learning partisan selectivity -- Partisan involvement and selective exposure -- The heart of the issue: partisan media and the problems facing the nation -- Partisanship and niche news.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
P96 .A832 U67 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002025187

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Partisans make the news -- Selective exposure in theory and in practice -- Using niche news -- Learning partisan selectivity -- Partisan involvement and selective exposure -- The heart of the issue: partisan media and the problems facing the nation -- Partisanship and niche news.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Journalism faculty used to speak of objectivity with great reverence, as the holy grail of good reporting. In the current climate, audiences do not expect to find objectivity in their media, and the common belief has been that political leanings by media outlets have been a problem. Stroud (Univ. of Texas, Austin) makes a convincing argument that there are both positive and negative aspects to polarized political news reporting. Using primarily quantitative data, the author reveals how audiences use selective exposure, perception, and retention in their news-media choices and political arguments. She demonstrates that the bifurcation actually worsens over time: "As people consume more partisan media that match their political predispositions, they develop more polarized attitudes." But Stroud also points out that partisan media consumption can increase the individual's political participation, which most see as a good thing. Unlike Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Joseph Cappella's Echo Chamber: Rush Limbaugh and the Conservative Media Establishment (CH, Sep'09, 47-0104), Stroud's work points out the leanings by both ends of the political spectrum. She calls for a media landscape that includes both partisan and nonpartisan media. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals; general readers. D. Caristi Ball State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Natalie Jomini Stroud is Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies and Assistant Director of the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Participation at the University of Texas, Austin.

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